You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Reinventing liberatory practice : how do we work with groups of which we are not a part?

Wilson, Erin 2005, Reinventing liberatory practice : how do we work with groups of which we are not a part?, in Engaging communities conference : Proceedings of International Conference on Engaging Communities, [The Congress], [Brisbane, Qld.], pp. 1-20.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
wilson-reinventingliberatory-2005.pdf Published version application/pdf 179.39KB 243

Title Reinventing liberatory practice : how do we work with groups of which we are not a part?
Author(s) Wilson, ErinORCID iD for Wilson, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6417-7276
Conference name International Conference on Engaging Communities (2005 : Brisbane, Australia)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 14 - 17 August 2005
Title of proceedings Engaging communities conference : Proceedings of International Conference on Engaging Communities
Editor(s) Gardiner, Dave
Scott, Katie
Publication date 2005
Conference series International Conference on Engaging Communities
Start page 1
End page 20
Publisher [The Congress]
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld.]
Keyword(s) community development
emancipatory practice
Summary The research that informed this paper asked: how can we work as allies of groups of which we are not a part? This question is particularly focused on work with people who have experienced colonisation by those who are aligned (by race, class, gender, culture or position) with the colonisers or oppressors. The research brings together literature in the fields of community work, adult education, and feminist and postcolonial theory, with Indigenous viewpoints and experience. An analysis of Indigenous viewpoints identified a range of key ideas about achieving social change.

These ideas are developed into several frameworks, two of which will be discussed here. The first framework offers a way of conceptualising work against oppression and proposes that it must involve a focus on fostering emancipatory agency. Emancipatory agency involves the capacity to know and to act towards social justice ends via meaning making which follows ethical criteria. An ethics of meaning making is proposed which includes a focus on: multiplicity and difference; the partial nature of all knowings; the context / situatedness of meaning; and the critical / reflective attitude in meaning making. This type of agency is dependent on the process of transformative dialogue which is inherently communal and is based on four micro processes: affirming the O/other; encountering, exploring and experiencing of multiple and partial views; moving between positions of self and others; and enacting meaning into the world. A second framework operationalises these ideas in the field of community development, and offers a method of practice.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940199 Community Service (excl. Work) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Engaging Communities
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025087

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 581 Abstract Views, 243 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Mar 2010, 14:19:49 EST by Erin Wilson

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.