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A comparison of the socio-cultural influences on body size perceptions and values among European Australian and Indigenous Fijian adolescent girls

Williams, L. K., Ricciardelli, L. A., McCabe, M., Mavoa, H. and Swinburn, B. 2005, A comparison of the socio-cultural influences on body size perceptions and values among European Australian and Indigenous Fijian adolescent girls, in APS 2005 : Proceedings of the 40th APS Annual Conference 28 September - 2 October 2005, Melbourne Vic : past reflections, future directions, Australian Psychological Society, Μelbourne, Vic..

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Title A comparison of the socio-cultural influences on body size perceptions and values among European Australian and Indigenous Fijian adolescent girls
Author(s) Williams, L. K.
Ricciardelli, L. A.ORCID iD for Ricciardelli, L. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7038-7410
McCabe, M.
Mavoa, H.
Swinburn, B.
Conference name Australian Psychological Society. Conference (40th : 2005 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 28 September - 2 October 2005
Title of proceedings APS 2005 : Proceedings of the 40th APS Annual Conference 28 September - 2 October 2005, Melbourne Vic : past reflections, future directions
Editor(s) Katsikitis, Mary
Publication date 2005
Conference series Australian Psychological Society Conference
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Μelbourne, Vic.
Summary Western women are experiencing increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity despite valuing slimness as ideal and equating thinness with attractiveness and beauty. Pacific populations are also experiencing high prevalence rates of overweight and obesity. A lage body size, however, has many positive connotations among pacific populations that stem from rich cultural practices such as feasts and deliberate fattening of women. There appears to be many sociocultural factors however, such as images of the slim ideal portrayed in Western media, influencing body image concerns that are shared between the two groups. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews was conducted to examine and compare the sociocultural influences on body size perceptionsand values. Participants include 16 European Australian and 16 Indigenous Fijian adolescent girls aged between 15 and 17 years. Inductive thematic analysis and analytical induction were qualitativemethods employed to facilitate interpretation of the findings. Preliminary findings suggest that Fijian adolescent girls experience greater conflict than European Australian girls about the desired body size endorsed in their community. Results also suggest that Indigenous Fijian girls place less importance than Australian girls on manipulating their body to achieve a specific ideal. Specific results of this study are reviewed and recommendations for future research are discussed.
ISBN 9780909881276
0909881278
Language eng
Field of Research 170105 Gender Psychology
200210 Pacific Cultural Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025203

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.