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Acceptability, impact and sustainability of the national pilot quality assurance system for self management programs

Nankervis, Joan, Laidlaw, Bella and Osborne, Richard 2006, Acceptability, impact and sustainability of the national pilot quality assurance system for self management programs, in The Australian Disease Management Association 2nd Annual National Conference - Evidence-based Disease Management in the 21st Century, Australian Disease Management Association, [Melbourne, Vic.].

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Title Acceptability, impact and sustainability of the national pilot quality assurance system for self management programs
Author(s) Nankervis, Joan
Laidlaw, Bella
Osborne, Richard
Conference name Australian Disease Management Association National Conference (2nd : 2006 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 7-8 Sep. 2006
Title of proceedings The Australian Disease Management Association 2nd Annual National Conference - Evidence-based Disease Management in the 21st Century
Publication date 2006
Publisher Australian Disease Management Association
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Summary Chronic condition self-management education and training interventions such as the Stanford Self Management Programs (SMP) have the capacity to improve health and quality of life of people with chronic conditions whilst reducing the use of health services. This is in line with the outcomes from the recent Council of Australian Governments’ meeting where it was indicated that self-management will be a centrepiece in forthcoming chronic disease initiatives.
Aim: report on a large national pilot quality assurance program involving the implementation and of an evaluation and quality monitoring system for SMPs including the provision of structured feedback to courses course leaders and service providers. During 2005/06 the quality assurance program was implemented at 11 diverse organisations across Australia. The program involved assisting organisations apply the 42-item Health Education Impact Questionnaire (HEIQ), a chronic disease health education outcome measure, and then observe and evaluate the value and impact of the quality program. Interviews with course leaders (n=60) and course participants (n=35) have elicited views about course quality and feedback processes.
Results: The evaluation revealed enablers and barriers to effective implementation and sustainability. Important enablers were:
- Course Leaders and organisations valued an Australia-wide system that provided feedback on course
quality and the impact on participants.
- Course Leaders were strongly personally motivated to respond appropriately to HEI-Q course
report feedback.
- Completing the questionnaire provided participants with the opportunity to reflect on issues that
emerge in the course content and reflect on their progression at the end of the SSMP.
Sustainability issues included:
- Organisations and course leaders require support, training and flexibility on how to administer and
manage the use of the HEI-Q.
- Availability of administrative resources in organisations to support the quality assurance activities.
- The requirement that course leaders are trained in interpreting HEI-Q course report data.
A quality improvement framework was developed which identified the actions required of key stakeholders to
support effective implementation.
Discussion: With the increasing endorsement of SMP across sectors it is important that course quality is known, is acceptable, and is communicated to stakeholders to inform and engender confidence in the SSMP. To effectively implement and sustain a quality improvement program for SMP, the processes and tools for measuring outcomes need to be responsive, flexible and easily integrated into the organisation and delivery of programs.
Notes Oral Presentation
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Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2006, Australian Disease Management Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025243

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.