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Who benefits most from participating in chronic disease self-management programs?

Nolte, S., Elsworth, G.R., Springer, A.L., Sinclair, A.J. and Osborne, R.H. 2006, Who benefits most from participating in chronic disease self-management programs?, in The Australian Disease Management Association 2nd Annual National Conference - Evidence-based Disease Management in the 21st Century, Australian Disease Management Association, [Melbourne, Vic.], pp. 23-24.

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Title Who benefits most from participating in chronic disease self-management programs?
Author(s) Nolte, S.
Elsworth, G.R.
Springer, A.L.
Sinclair, A.J.
Osborne, R.H.
Conference name Australian Disease Management Association National Conference (2nd : 2006 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 7-8 Sep. 2006
Title of proceedings The Australian Disease Management Association 2nd Annual National Conference - Evidence-based Disease Management in the 21st Century
Publication date 2006
Start page 23
End page 24
Publisher Australian Disease Management Association
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Summary Objectives: To quantify the benefits that people receive from participating in self-management courses and identify subgroups that benefit most.
Research Design: People with a wide range of chronic conditions attending self-management courses (N=1,341 individuals) were administered the generic Health Education Impact Questionnaire (HEI-Q). Data were collected before the first session (baseline) and at the end of courses (follow-up) resulting in 842 complete responses. The median (interquartile range) age was 64 (54 to 73) years and most participants were female (75%). Outcomes were categorized as Substantial improvement (Effect Size, ES ≥ 0.5), Minimal/No change (ES -0.49 to 0.49) and Substantial decline (ES ≤ -0.5).
Results: On average, one third of participants reported substantial benefits after attending a self-management course. Proportions of participants reporting substantial benefits ranged from 49% in Skill and technique acquisition to 27% in Health service navigation. Stratification by gender, age and education showed that younger participants were more likely to benefit, particularly young women. No further subgroup differences were observed.
Conclusions: Given that the health of people with chronic diseases tends to decline, this evaluation is reassuring in that about one third of participants coming from a wide range of backgrounds receive substantial improvements in their self-management skills.
Notes Oral Presentation
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Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2006, Australian Disease Management Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025248

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.