Reconstructing the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Hong Kong by using data from HIV positive tests and diagnoses of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

Chau, P. H., Yip, Paul S. F. and Cui, Jisheng S. 2003, Reconstructing the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Hong Kong by using data from HIV positive tests and diagnoses of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society : series c (applied statistics), vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 237-248.

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Title Reconstructing the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Hong Kong by using data from HIV positive tests and diagnoses of acquired immune deficiency syndrome
Author(s) Chau, P. H.
Yip, Paul S. F.
Cui, Jisheng S.
Journal name Journal of the Royal Statistical Society : series c (applied statistics)
Volume number 52
Issue number 2
Start page 237
End page 248
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2003
ISSN 0035-9254
Summary The human immunodeficiency virus–acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV–AIDS) epidemic in Hong Kong has been under surveillance in the form of voluntary reporting since 1984. However, there has been little discussion or research on the reconstruction of the HIV incidence curve. This paper is the first to use a modified back-projection method to estimate the incidence of HIV in Hong Kong on the basis of the number of positive HIV tests only. The model proposed has several advantages over the original back-projection method based on AIDS data only. First, not all HIV-infected individuals will develop AIDS by the time of analysis, but some of them may undertake an HIV test; therefore, the HIV data set contains more information than the AIDS data set. Second, the HIV diagnosis curve usually has a smoother pattern than the AIDS diagnosis curve, as it is not affected by redefinition of AIDS. Third, the time to positive HIV diagnosis is unlikely to be affected by treatment effects, as it is unlikely that an individual receives medication before the diagnosis of HIV. Fourth, the induction period from HIV infection to the first HIV positive test is usually shorter than the incubation period which is from HIV infection to diagnosis of AIDS. With a shorter induction period, more information becomes available for estimating the HIV incidence curve. Finally, this method requires the number of positive HIV diagnoses only, which is readily available from HIV–AIDS surveillance systems in many countries. It is estimated that, in Hong Kong, the cumulative number of HIV infections during the period 1979–2000 is about 2600, whereas an estimate based only on AIDS data seems to give an underestimate.
Language eng
Field of Research 010401 Applied Statistics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Royal Statistical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025303

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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