Bivariate variance-component analysis, with application to systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol levels in the Framingham Heart Study

Cui, Jisheng S. and Sheffield, L. J. 2002, Bivariate variance-component analysis, with application to systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol levels in the Framingham Heart Study, in GAW13 2002 : Analysis of Longitudinal Family Data for Complex Diseases and Related Risk Factors, BioMed Central Ltd, [New Orleans, La.], pp. 1-5.

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Title Bivariate variance-component analysis, with application to systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol levels in the Framingham Heart Study
Author(s) Cui, Jisheng S.
Sheffield, L. J.
Conference name Genetic Analysis Workshop (13th : 2002 : New Orleans, La.)
Conference location New Orleans, La.
Conference dates 11-14 Nov. 2002
Title of proceedings GAW13 2002 : Analysis of Longitudinal Family Data for Complex Diseases and Related Risk Factors
Publication date 2002
Start page 1
End page 5
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Place of publication [New Orleans, La.]
Keyword(s) Adult Children
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood Pressure/genetics/*physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases/*blood/*epidemiology/genetics
Cholesterol/*blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Siblings
Summary Background :
The correlations between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and total cholesterol levels (CHOL) might result from genetic or environmental factors that determine variation in the phenotypes and are shared by family members. Based on 330 nuclear families in the Framingham Heart Study, we used a multivariate normal model, implemented in the software FISHER, to estimate genetic and shared environmental components of variation and genetic and shared environmental correlation between the phenotypes. The natural logarithm of the phenotypes measured at the last visit in both Cohort 1 and 2 was used in the analyses. The antihypertensive treatment effect was corrected before adjustment of the systolic blood pressure for age, sex, and cohort.
Results :
The univariate correlation coefficient was statistically significant for sibling pairs and parent-offspring pairs, but not significant for spouse pairs. In the bivariate analysis, the cross-trait correlation coefficients were not statistically significant for all relative pairs. The shared environmental correlation was statistically significant, but the genetic correlation was not significant.
Conclusion :
There is no significant evidence for a close genetic correlation between systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol levels. However, some shared environmental factors may determine the variation of both phenotypes.
Notes Appears in BMC Genetics 2003, 4(Suppl 1):S81
ISSN 1471-2156
Language eng
Field of Research 110299 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025311

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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