Risk of prostate cancer associated with a family history in an era of rapid increase in prostate cancer diagnosis (Australia)

Staples, M. P., Giles, G. G., English, D. R., McCredie, M. R. E., Severi, G., Cui, J. S. and Hopper, J. L. 2003, Risk of prostate cancer associated with a family history in an era of rapid increase in prostate cancer diagnosis (Australia), Cancer causes & control : : an international journal of studies of cancer in human populations, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 161-6.


Title Risk of prostate cancer associated with a family history in an era of rapid increase in prostate cancer diagnosis (Australia)
Author(s) Staples, M. P.
Giles, G. G.
English, D. R.
McCredie, M. R. E.
Severi, G.
Cui, J. S.
Hopper, J. L.
Journal name Cancer causes & control : : an international journal of studies of cancer in human populations
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Start page 161
End page 6
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publication date 2003-03
ISSN 0957-5243
Summary OBJECTIVE: We conducted a case-control study of prostate cancer and familial risk of the disease in Australia between 1994 and 1998, a period during which the incidence of prostate cancer increased dramatically with widespread use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. METHODS: 1475 cases and 1405 controls were asked about prostate cancer in their first-degree relatives. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Cases were more likely to report a family history of prostate cancer than controls (OR 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.9) and cases reporting an affected relative were younger (58.8 versus 60.9 years, p < 0.0001). The OR for an affected first-degree relative increased with increasing number of affected relatives and decreased with increasing age of the case. The OR for more than one affected first-degree relative was 6.9 (95% CI 2.7-18). The OR for an affected brother was 3.9 (95% CI 2.5-6.1) and for an affected father was 2.9 (95% CI 2.1-3.9) but these were not significantly different (p = 0.2). When analyses were repeated including only diagnoses made in relatives prior to 1992, the risks were generally similar except that the OR for an affected brother decreased to 3.1 (95% CI 1.2-3.9). When only relatives' diagnoses made after 1991 were included results were again similar to those for all relatives, although the effect for brothers was greater and the attenuation with age at diagnosis dissipated. CONCLUSIONS: The recent introduction of PSA testing that has resulted in a greater prevalence of apparent prostate cancer, does not appear to have substantially altered familial risks of disease, although effects associated with brothers may be inflated.
Language eng
Field of Research 111202 Cancer Diagnosis
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Kluwer Academic Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025333

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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