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Effectiveness of targeted falls prevention programme in subacute hospital setting : randomised controlled trial

Haines, Terry P., Bennell, Kim L., Osborne, Richard H. and Hill, Keith D. 2004, Effectiveness of targeted falls prevention programme in subacute hospital setting : randomised controlled trial, British Medical Journal, vol. 328, no. 7441, pp. 1-6.

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Title Effectiveness of targeted falls prevention programme in subacute hospital setting : randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Haines, Terry P.
Bennell, Kim L.
Osborne, Richard H.
Hill, Keith D.
Journal name British Medical Journal
Volume number 328
Issue number 7441
Start page 1
End page 6
Publisher B M J Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2004-03
ISSN 0959-535X
1468-5833
Summary Objective : To assess the effectiveness of a targeted, multiple intervention falls prevention programme in reducing falls and injuries related to falls in a subacute hospital.

Design : Randomised controlled trial of a targeted multiple intervention programme implemented in addition to usual carecompared with usual care alone.

Setting :Three subacute wards in a metropolitan hospital specialising in rehabilitation and care of elderly patients.

Participants : 626 men and women aged 38 to 99 years (average 80 years) were recruited from consecutive admissions to subacute hospital wards.

Intervention : Falls risk alert card with information brochure, exercise programme, education programme, and hip protectors.

Main outcome measures :
Incidence rate of falls, injuries related to falls, and proportion of participants who experienced one or more falls during their stay in hospital.

Results :
Participants in the intervention group (n = 310) experienced 30% fewer falls than participants in the control group (n = 316). This difference was significant (Peto log rank test P = 0.045) and was most obvious after 45 days of observation. In the intervention group there was a trend for a reduction in the proportion of participants who experienced falls (relative risk 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.56 to 1.06) and 28% fewer falls resulted in injury (log rank test P = 0.20).

Conclusions : A targeted multiple intervention falls prevention programme reduces the incidence of falls in the subacute hospital setting.
Notes This article has been published in the BMJ : Haines, Terry P., Bennell, Kim L., Osborne, Richard H. and Hill, Keith D. 2004-03, Effectiveness of targeted falls prevention programme in subacute hospital setting : randomised controlled trial, British Medical Journal, vol. 328, no. 7441, pp. 1-6., and can also be viewed on the journal’s website at www.bmj.com
Language eng
Field of Research 111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative)
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, BMJ Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025447

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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