Openly accessible

Delivering sustainability through the adaptive reuse of commercial buildings : the Melbourne CBD challenge

Wilkinson, Sara, James, Kimberley and Reed, Richard 2009, Delivering sustainability through the adaptive reuse of commercial buildings : the Melbourne CBD challenge, in PRRES 2008 : Proceedings of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society 15th Annual Conference, Pacific Rim Real Estate Society (PPRES), Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 1-19.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
wilkinson-deliveringsustainability-2009.pdf Published version application/pdf 211.39KB 107

Title Delivering sustainability through the adaptive reuse of commercial buildings : the Melbourne CBD challenge
Author(s) Wilkinson, Sara
James, Kimberley
Reed, Richard
Conference name Pacific Rim Real Estate Society. Conference (15th : 2009 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 18-21 January 2009
Title of proceedings PRRES 2008 : Proceedings of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society 15th Annual Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2009
Conference series Pacific Rim Real Estate Society Conference
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Pacific Rim Real Estate Society (PPRES)
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) Australia
policy makers
commercial buildings
adaptation, reuse
sustainability
Summary The City of Melbourne is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2020 (Arup 2008) and have set a target of adapting twelve hundred commercial buildings to incorporate sustainability initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the sector (AECOM 2008). In order to meet this target the City of Melbourne is taking a proactive approach to establish strategies to deliver sustainability in the built environment within the 2020 timeframe. With regards to upgrading and building maintenance 71% of investment is used for such works (Department of the Environment 2008) and the total Australian property stock was worth over $6 trillion in June 2008. Given that building services in commercial buildings typically lasts between 20-30 years and the average age of the stock is 31 years – it appears that many properties are due for adaptation and there is major opportunity for adaptation that alleviates the impact of global warming and climate change.

Uncertainty surfaces such as; how much adaptation of existing stock is typically undertaken? And is the target of 1200 adaptations before 2020 achievable? Furthermore how could the City identify which buildings are most probable to be adapted prior to 2020? This paper details the configuration of a database of Melbourne buildings populated with data about physical, social, economic legislative and environmental attributes. There is a discussion about how the database will be used to determine; how much adaptive reuse has been undertaken historically; if any triggers to adaptation can be identified; and whether any relationships between adaptation physical, social, economic, legislative and environmental attributes and adaptation exist. The relevance of this research is obvious to all policy makers where adaptation of existing commercial buildings is perceived a as key component of delivering sustainability.
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 961208 Rehabilitation of Degraded Urban and Industrial Environments
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, PRRES
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025517

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 603 Abstract Views, 112 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 19 Mar 2010, 16:35:19 EST by Sandra Dunoon

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.