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Relevance of health literacy models for people with severe mental illness

Taket, Ann, Graham, Melissa and Hakman, Natalie 2007, Relevance of health literacy models for people with severe mental illness, in IUHPE 2007 : 19th IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion & Health Education : health promotion comes of age : research, policy & practice for the 21st century, International Union for Health Promotion and Education, [Vancouver, B.C.].

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Title Relevance of health literacy models for people with severe mental illness
Author(s) Taket, Ann
Graham, Melissa
Hakman, Natalie
Conference name IUHPE. World Conference (19th : 2007 : Vancouver, Canada)
Conference location Vancouver, B.C.
Conference dates 10-15 Jun. 2007
Title of proceedings IUHPE 2007 : 19th IUHPE World Conference on Health Promotion & Health Education : health promotion comes of age : research, policy & practice for the 21st century
Publication date 2007
Publisher International Union for Health Promotion and Education
Place of publication [Vancouver, B.C.]
Summary People with severe mental illness experience elevated levels of impairment, morbidity and health-risk behaviours compared with the general population. Despite this, it is consistently reported that they do not visit health professionals, including preventative health professionals, as regularly as the general population. Their poor health suggests that current health promotion efforts have been largely ineffective in addressing their specific needs. Barriers that might explain this include lack of motivation, expense and lack of access. Health literacy is also a potentially important factor. As a part of a programme of work to develop appropriate and effective health promotion for this group, we have explored existing health-literacy models and their relevance to marginalized populations, in particular, people experiencing severe mental illness. A comprehensive search of the literature was undertaken. Models of health literacy identified were analyzed to determine the source population, underpinning theory/frameworks, supporting research evidence and to consider their potential generalisability. This paper presents an analysis of existing health-literacy models in the context of severe mental illness. We propose that because existing models of health literacy were developed through consultation with people experiencing challenges to specific health and social issues, for example, cancer, low income and limited education, this raises questions as to the applicability of these models to people experiencing severe and ongoing mental illness. Whilst such individuals were not actively excluded in the development of the existing models, we propose the development of an alternative model which considers this population's needs and limitations in accessing effective health-promotion campaigns/programs.
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Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2007, IUHPE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30025968

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.