You are not logged in.

Contextual influences on femoral injecting behaviour in the UK Randomised Injectable Opiate Treatment Trial

Miller, P.G., Forzisi, L., Lintzeris, N., Zador, D., Metrebian, N. and Van Der Waal, R. 2006, Contextual influences on femoral injecting behaviour in the UK Randomised Injectable Opiate Treatment Trial, in NCIDU 2006 : Presentations of the National Conference on Injecting Drug Use, Exchange Supplies, [London, England].

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Contextual influences on femoral injecting behaviour in the UK Randomised Injectable Opiate Treatment Trial
Author(s) Miller, P.G.ORCID iD for Miller, P.G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Forzisi, L.
Lintzeris, N.
Zador, D.
Metrebian, N.
Van Der Waal, R.
Conference name National Conference on Injecting Drug Use (2006 : London, England)
Conference location London, England
Conference dates 12-13 Oct. 2006
Title of proceedings NCIDU 2006 : Presentations of the National Conference on Injecting Drug Use
Publication date 2006
Publisher Exchange Supplies
Place of publication [London, England]
Summary Femoral injecting amongst participants of the Randomised Injectable Opiate Treatment Trial (RIOTT) has created a number of procedural, ethical and medical dilemmas for staff, clients and researchers. This study investigated the effect on femoral injecting behaviour of a drug consumption room (DCR) in the context of the RIOTT currently being conducted at the Maudsley Hospital, South London. It uses in-depth qualitative interviews with 10 RIOTT clients to investigate the effects of this environmental intervention on the injecting behaviour of individuals who injected femorally upon treatment entry. Interviewees were selected on the basis of membership in one of four groups: 1) never injected femorally, 2) injected femorally prior to trial and have ceased completely, 3) injected femorally prior to trial and have ceased within the DCR, and 4) have continued to inject femorally the inside and outside clinical settings. The paper uses case studies and clinical protocols to interpret changes in behaviour in injecting behaviour in regards to the goals of treatment. Preliminary results indicate that there are major advantages and disadvantages associated with femoral injecting. The most commonly reported reason for commencing femoral injecting was a lack of other viable veins and interviewee narratives illustrate how this issue use addressed within the context of the DCR. Within this setting, the paper explores the boundaries of harm reduction in the context of a traditional 'risk boundary' within the 'ideal' risk environment. Other issues explored include: gender differences in femoral injecting episodes, femoral injecting as a risk boundary and the importance of time pressures as a major predictor of choosing to inject femorally.
Notes Invited Plenary Speaker
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30026363

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 431 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 31 Mar 2010, 10:17:00 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.