The odd bod, the icon and the modest woman : the differences and similarities amongst three Australian women music teachers, performers and composers

Jenkins, Louise E. 2006, The odd bod, the icon and the modest woman : the differences and similarities amongst three Australian women music teachers, performers and composers, in AARME 2006 : Australian Association for Research in Music Education : proceedings of the XXVIIIth annual conference, Music education : standards and practices, 24-26 September 2006, AARME, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 57-65.

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Title The odd bod, the icon and the modest woman : the differences and similarities amongst three Australian women music teachers, performers and composers
Author(s) Jenkins, Louise E.
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Music Education. Annual Conference (28th : 2006 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 24 - 26 September 2006
Title of proceedings AARME 2006 : Australian Association for Research in Music Education : proceedings of the XXVIIIth annual conference, Music education : standards and practices, 24-26 September 2006
Editor(s) De Vries, Peter
Southcott, Jane
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Music Education Conference
Start page 57
End page 65
Publisher AARME
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Throughout Australia's history there have been many women who have been active in music education, performance and composition, despite the traditional family commitments which women have negotiated, overcoming prevailing negative attitudes to success outside the home. The period 1900 to 1950 in Australia saw significant changes in the social structure such as universal suffrage, Federation and World War 1. These changes broadened opportunities for some women to negotiate a life-time career in music. The researcher has identified three significant women who were able to forge careers in music during this time in music teaching, composition and performance. The women were Mona McBurney, Ruby Davy and Ruth Flockart. The selected women were all unique; McBurney was an outstanding composer for her time, being the first woman in Australia to compose an opera. Also, she was the first woman in Australia to gain her Bachelor of Music. Despite these successes, she had a reputation for her overwhelming modesty and shyness. Davy was significant because of her diversified ability as a teacher, performer, composer and elocutionist, and because she was the first woman in Australia to gain her Doctorate of Music. Davy has been described by several people as unusual, strange, and an 'odd bod'. Flockart was a music teacher at Methodist Ladies' College Melbourne for almost fifty years, half of those as the Director of Music. She was a significant figure in contemporary music education, particularly as a choral conductor, where she has been described as an 'icon'. This research looks at the differences and similarities amongst these three women in terms of family life, social position, education and support systems, and their ability to negotiate a career in music teaching, performance and composition.
ISBN 9780980311617
0980311616
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
130308 Gender, Sexuality and Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, AARME
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30026382

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of International and Political Studies
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