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Technology education, science and science education : exploring the relationship

Jane, Beverley and Tytler, Russell 2003, Technology education, science and science education : exploring the relationship, in Initiatives in Technology Education: Comparative Perspectives: Proceedings of the American-Australian Technology Education Forum, Technical Foundation of America and the Griffith University Centre for Technology Education Research, [Gold Coast, Queensland], pp. 97-111.

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Title Technology education, science and science education : exploring the relationship
Author(s) Jane, Beverley
Tytler, Russell
Conference name American-Australian Technology Education Forum (2003 : Gold Coast, Queensland)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 5-7 January 2003
Title of proceedings Initiatives in Technology Education: Comparative Perspectives: Proceedings of the American-Australian Technology Education Forum
Editor(s) Martin, Gene
Middleton, Howard
Publication date 2003
Conference series American-Australian Technology Education Forum
Start page 97
End page 111
Total pages vi, 348 p.
Publisher Technical Foundation of America and the Griffith University Centre for Technology Education Research
Place of publication [Gold Coast, Queensland]
Summary In this paper the nature of technology education in relation to science and science education is explored. Ways forward are indicated for both technology and science in the curriculum so that the two areas can be mutually supportive. In the 1990s, when curriculum writers were attempting to provide technology a unique place in the curriculum, they tended to downplay the relationship between technology and science. One reason for this tendency derives from a perception that science is an academic and elitist discipline and technology is well served by emphasizing the distance between the two. The other reason is perhaps political, that science, by virtue of its status in the community, and the status of its special type of knowledge, would be in a position, if allowed, to subsume the new subject. There are philosophical and historical precedents that justify such a concern. In tracing the historical relationships between science and technology, in professional practice, in philosophical positioning, and in school curriculum, we inevitably need to deal with the politics of school subjects.

The position taken in this paper is that science and technology are different, both in their epistemological foundations, and in the nature of the professional communities and the concerns of individual practitioners within the two areas. In clarifying these differences the essential nature of technology and of science are illuminated. The paper also explores ways in which the two areas can benefit from each other’s existence in the curriculum, and ways of approaching teaching that both clarifies the special nature of each type of knowledge, and allows them to be mutually supportive. This may necessitate a reconstruction of the nature of school science.
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Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, Technical Foundation of America
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30026399

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.