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Microbial-based therapy of cancer: a new twist to age old practice

Punj, Vasu, Saint-Dic, Djenann, Daghfal, Sharon and Kanwar, Jagat R. 2004, Microbial-based therapy of cancer: a new twist to age old practice, Cancer biology and therapy, vol. 3, no. 8, pp. 708-714.

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Title Microbial-based therapy of cancer: a new twist to age old practice
Author(s) Punj, Vasu
Saint-Dic, Djenann
Daghfal, Sharon
Kanwar, Jagat R.
Journal name Cancer biology and therapy
Volume number 3
Issue number 8
Start page 708
End page 714
Publisher Landes Bioscience
Place of publication Austin, Tex.
Publication date 2004-08-10
ISSN 1538-4047
1555-8576
Summary The use of bacteria in the regression of tumors has long been known. Various approaches for using bacteria in cancer therapy include the use of bacteria as sensitizing agents for chemotherapy, as delivery agents for cancer drugs and as agents for gene therapy. The tumor regression stimulated by infecting microorganisms has been attributed to activation of the immune system of the host. However, recent studies indicate that when tumor-harboring mice with defective immune systems are infected with certain microorganisms, the regression of the tumor is still observed, suggesting that there are other host factors contributing to the microbial associated regression of tumors. Since the use of live or attenuated bacteria for tumor regression has associated toxic effects, studies are in progress to identify a pure microbial metabolite or any component of the microbial cell that might have anti-cancer activity. It has now been demonstrated that a redox protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a cupredoxin, can enter into human cancer cells and trigger the apoptotic cell death. In vivo, this cupredoxin can lead to the regression of tumor growth in immunodeficient mice harboring xenografted melanomas and breast cancer tumors without inducing significant toxic effects, suggesting that it has potential anti-cancer activity. This bacterial protein interacts with p53 and modulates mammalian cellular activity. Hence, it could potentially be used as an anti-cancer agent for solid tumors and has translational value in tumor-targeted or in combinational-biochemotherapy strategies for cancer treatments. Here, we focus on diverse approaches to cancer biotherapy, including bacteriolytic and bacterially-derived anti-cancer agents with an emphasis on their mechanism of action and therapeutic potential.
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Language eng
Field of Research 111204 Cancer Therapy (excl Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy)
111201 Cancer Cell Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Landes Bioscience
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30026575

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Technology Research and Innovation
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Created: Thu, 01 Apr 2010, 14:23:42 EST by Jagat Kanwar

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.