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Development in Papua New Guinea : various meanings in the context of logging in West New Britain

Nelson, Peter Desmond Michael 1999, Development in Papua New Guinea : various meanings in the context of logging in West New Britain, M.A. thesis, School of Australian and International Studies, Deakin University.

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Title Development in Papua New Guinea : various meanings in the context of logging in West New Britain
Author Nelson, Peter Desmond Michael
Institution Deakin University
School School of Australian and International Studies
Faculty Faculty of Arts
Degree name M.A.
Thesis advisor Wetherell, David
Date submitted 1999
Keyword(s) Forests and forestry - Social aspects - New Britain Island (Papua New Guinea)
New Britain Island (Papua New Guinea) - Social life and customs
Summary Development in Papua New Guinea ... is research into village level issues of logging. In New Britain, nationals are offered royalties for cutting their rainforest. Information about ecology and biodiversity is usually late in coming, and such information to them does not appear to advance their development. This thesis offers the most specific method for dealing with small communities in Papua New Guinea, and confronts the issue of self development. It is posited that all other development must encourage self development in Papua New Guinea. Evidence brought here shows the need to make the Melanesian community central to development strategies.

To accomplish such a strategy, there is a need to consider Melanesian cultures. An explanation of world views ensues. The world views of people of the Pasismanua region, of New Britain's south coast, was compared broadly with Melanesian cultures and Melanesian development in a variety of circumstances. Consequently, the suggestions made are broadly applicable to situations where resources must be well monitored. There are many such situations in Pacific nations, which suggests that the thesis will be of usc to a wide research community.

Since research is grounded in ethnographic as well as other research, this kind of study generates many other research questions, and the research is designed to lead to other studies. Certain aspects of the design become disclosed when the research has progressed. As well, the background of an expatriate researcher is intrusive, and must be mitigated by some form of participation in the host culture. This is a central tenet of the thesis. This participation increases sensitivity to culture and yields a circumspect consideration of the colonial issue. Occupied for many years by colonial powers especially Australia, all New Guinea including West New Britain shows the effects of colonisation. It also shows evidence of the new colonialism of cash-cropping, and of the destruction of biodiversity. This becomes a central theme, as does the position of this researcher as a participant in a global economic culture encroaching on and invited by Papua New Guinea.
Notes How can people improve lifestyle in the Third World? A blueprint is needed for development, and success involves dialogue. Tradition and commerce create environmental and social problems in rainforests in "Man-o'-War Harbour" district. Solutions to these come from researchers' participation in culture and from global awareness.
Language eng
Description of original xvi, 164 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
Dewey Decimal Classification 333.751509958
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30027910

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.