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Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy for severe enteropathy in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID)

Chua, I., Standish, R., Lear, S., Harbord, M., Eren, E., Raeiszadeh, M., Workman, S. and Webster, D. 2007, Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy for severe enteropathy in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), Clinical and experimental immunology, vol. 150, no. 2, pp. 306-311, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03481.x.

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Title Anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy for severe enteropathy in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID)
Author(s) Chua, I.
Standish, R.
Lear, S.
Harbord, M.
Eren, E.
Raeiszadeh, M.
Workman, S.
Webster, D.
Journal name Clinical and experimental immunology
Volume number 150
Issue number 2
Start page 306
End page 311
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0009-9104
Summary We present three common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients with
severe inflammatory bowel disease of unknown aetiology, resistant to steroid
treatment, treated with infliximab.After exclusion of any infection, infliximab
was given at a dose of 5 mg/kg every 4 weeks for a 3 month induction followed
by every 4–8 weeks depending on clinical response. Two of these patients had
predominantly small bowel disease; they both showed clinical response to
infliximab with weight gain and improvement of quality of life scores. The
third patient had large bowel involvement with profuse watery diarrhea; this
patient improved dramatically within 48 hours of having infliximab
treatment. All three patients have been maintained on infliximab treatment
for between 5 and 53 months (mean 37 months) with no evidence of increased
susceptibility to infections in the patients with small bowel disease, although
the third patient developed two urinary tract infections and a herpes zoster
infection following therapy. This is the first small case series to show that
infliximab is a useful addition to current therapy in this rare group of patients
with potentially life threatening enteritis.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03481.x
Field of Research 110702 Applied Immunology (incl Antibody Engineering, Xenotransplantation and T-cell Therapies)
110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, British Society for Immunology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028148

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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