Cultural connections across time and place : Wardell's late 19th century Genazzano FCJ College Kew

de Jong, Ursula M 2009, Cultural connections across time and place : Wardell's late 19th century Genazzano FCJ College Kew, in SAHANZ 2009 : Cultural crossroads : proceedings of the 26th International SAHANZ Conference, the University of Auckland, 2-5 July 2009, Society of Architectural Historians Australia & New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand, pp. 1-16.

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Title Cultural connections across time and place : Wardell's late 19th century Genazzano FCJ College Kew
Author(s) de Jong, Ursula M
Conference name SAHANZ Conference (26th : 2009 : Auckland, New Zealand)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 July 2009
Title of proceedings SAHANZ 2009 : Cultural crossroads : proceedings of the 26th International SAHANZ Conference, the University of Auckland, 2-5 July 2009
Editor(s) Gatley, Julia
Publication date 2009
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 1
End page 16
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians Australia & New Zealand
Place of publication Auckland, New Zealand
Keyword(s) 19th Century history
FCJs
Wardell
Summary The Catholic Church was profoundly affected by the 1872 Victorian Education Act, which made education secular, compulsory and free, and led to the withdrawal of state aid to religious schools. In order for the Church to run its own schools, it had to look overseas for help and invited religious teaching orders, such as the Faithful Companions of Jesus (FCJs) to set up schools in Victoria, Australia. In many instances purpose built buildings were designed by architects. William Wardell was well established in private practice in Sydney when he designed the new Convent and School, Kew, Victoria, for the FCJ Sisters, in the late 1880s. Building commenced just before the crash of Marvellous Melbourne. Less than half of the total concept of Wardell’s original plan was built. It opened for business in April 1891. Today this building forms the heart of the contemporary Genazzano FCJ College Kew. Many histories intersect in this commission. The vision for Catholic education in Victoria in the late 19th century is critical. The FCJs charism and their experience of teaching in Europe, in France, England, Ireland, Italy and Switzerland, provides a model for their work in Australia. At this time the importance of architecture to society is made manifest in education and its demands on building: if learning is valued then buildings should reflect this, for public buildings can shape morality. Wardell was trained as a Gothic Revival architect and his building participates in a broader medieval and Gothic tradition. Wardell’s original plan for this late Victorian Gothic style asymmetrical three-storeyed building, was designed to integrate a convent, school, chapel, and dormitories. This paper considers architectural history from diverse perspectives, educational, social, religious, economic and political, recognising the complexity of this project and the people who played a part in its conception and realisation.
ISBN 9780473150655
Language eng
Field of Research 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2009
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028434

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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