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Knowing in, through and about : the PhD journey

Haysom, Rob 2010, Knowing in, through and about : the PhD journey. In Forrest, David and Grierson, Elizabeth (ed), Doctoral journey in art education : reflections on doctoral studies by Australian and New Zealand art educators, Australian Scholarly Publishing, Melbourne, Vic., pp.141-155.

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Title Knowing in, through and about : the PhD journey
Author(s) Haysom, Rob
Title of book Doctoral journey in art education : reflections on doctoral studies by Australian and New Zealand art educators
Editor(s) Forrest, David
Grierson, Elizabeth
Publication date 2010
Chapter number 11
Total chapters 19
Start page 141
End page 155
Total pages 15
Publisher Australian Scholarly Publishing
Place of Publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary This study involves an account of the factors leading to the development and evolution of three public art spaces concerned with contemporary art in the 1980s in Melbourne. The three spaces – Heide Park and Art Gallery, 200 Gertrude Street, and the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art developed programs that promoted and presented contemporary art throughout the eighties. Prior to the 1980s the National Gallery of Victoria was the major public institution concerned with the promotion and presentation of contemporary art in Melbourne.

The study describes and analyses events leading to the establishment of each new space and investigates the formations and groups who played leading roles. A case study approach has been used which explores the networks and groupings that developed in setting up and maintaining each space. Theoretical perspectives drawn from Bourdieu, Williams and Wolff are employed in order to explore the social and cultural meanings of the networks and groups responsible for developing the three art spaces. These perspectives are used to help account for the motives and ideology employed by individuals and groups, such as artists, academics and politicians.

Each of the three spaces mainly developed from different clusters and groups, although some individuals had involvement in more than one of the spaces. The study concludes with a cultural analysis that identifies several key factors, such as forms of patronage, government policy direction and the power and influence of various sectors and formations. Government funding for art is a complex area of activity that draws upon a wide constituency of individuals and agents that include artists, wealthy business people, collectors, and so on. The study reveals much about government intervention and cultural and social formations promoting art in Melbourne during the 1980s.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner
ISBN 9781921509766
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
ERA Research output type B Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2010, Australian Scholarly Publishing
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028573

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.