Organising inclusion work : key factors for success

Wilson, Erin and Jenkin, Elena 2010, Organising inclusion work : key factors for success, in More than social inclusion for people with intellectual disability : Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Roundtable on Intellectual Disability Policy, School of Social Work and Social Policy, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, pp. 52-61.

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Title Organising inclusion work : key factors for success
Formatted title Inclusion : Making it happen: Key elements for disability organisations to facilitate inclusion
Author(s) Wilson, Erin
Jenkin, Elena
Conference name Roundtable on Intellectual Disability Policy (4th : 2009 : Bundoora, Victoria)
Conference location Bundoora, Victoria
Conference dates 23 October 2009
Title of proceedings More than social inclusion for people with intellectual disability : Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Roundtable on Intellectual Disability Policy
Editor(s) Bigby, Christine
Fyffe, Chris
Publication date 2010
Conference series Roundtable on Intellectual Disability Policy
Start page 52
End page 61
Total pages 10
Publisher School of Social Work and Social Policy, La Trobe University
Place of publication Bundoora, Victoria
Keyword(s) inclusion practice
organisation
intellectual disability
Summary This paper presents the findings of research conducted by Scope in 2007-2009. It proposes a way of categorising the dominant modes or orientations to inclusion work in the disability sector in Australia and identifies the barriers and enablers to it. The research engaged with seventeen ‘inclusion workers’ or managers in Victoria and Perth, Western Australia and sought examples of successful practice along with the ingredients of success, and outcomes of the work. Coincidently, the majority of examples provided related to inclusion work with people with intellectual disability, and a minority of these relating to people with severe intellectual disability. This data was analysed to identify key organisational factors required for successful inclusion work. Most importantly, respondents were also asked to identify the outcomes of inclusion work for individuals with a disability and their families, as well as for services, and for the communities with whom they engaged. The paper offers a way of conceptualising the breadth of inclusion work, including work focused on presence and participation, as well as the larger scale activities of social engineering or social change. The paper presents key ingredients for successful organisational approaches to such work.
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ISBN 9781921377853
Language eng
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
111703 Care for Disabled
160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 940199 Community Service (excl. Work) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2010, La Trobe University, School of Social Work and Social Policy
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028603

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Centre for Health through Action on Social Exclusion
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Created: Thu, 13 May 2010, 18:57:23 EST by Erin Wilson

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.