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Students' perceptions of the value of the elements of an online learning environment : looking back in moving forward

Palmer, Stuart and Holt, Dale 2010, Students' perceptions of the value of the elements of an online learning environment : looking back in moving forward, Interactive learning environments, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 135-151.

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Title Students' perceptions of the value of the elements of an online learning environment : looking back in moving forward
Author(s) Palmer, Stuart
Holt, Dale
Journal name Interactive learning environments
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Start page 135
End page 151
Total pages 17
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2010-06
ISSN 1049-4820
1744-5191
Keyword(s) online learning environment
student evaluation
satisfaction
learning experience
e-learning portfolio
Summary In 2003, Deakin University implemented a centralised learning management system (LMS) under the banner of Deakin Studies Online (DSO), as well as implementing policies requiring all its units of study to have at least a basic online presence from 2004. Given the scope of the university's commitment to online education, it was considered essential to evaluate the effectiveness of this investment. Based on more than 5400 responses obtained from students in 2004 and 2005 as part of the DSO evaluation survey, the analysis presented here identifies those elements of the online learning environment (OLE) that are most used and valued by students, those elements of the OLE that students most want to see improved, and, those factors that most contribute to students' perceptions that use of the OLE enhanced their learning experience. The most used and valued elements were core LMS functions, including accessing unit information, accessing lecture/tute/lab notes, interacting with unit learning resources, reading online discussions, contacting lecturers/tutors and submitting assignments online. The OLE elements identified as most needing attention were receiving feedback on assignments; viewing my marks; and reviewing unit progress. Students felt that using DSO enhanced their learning experience when they were adequately supported by unit teachers and technical support services; when they were able to find and use unit information; and when they were able to read the online contributions of other unit members. The retrospective analysis of data collected in the period 2004-2005 has been shaped by a forward-looking agenda. The array of elements available within, and in association with, traditional LMSs which has emerged since that time raises the future challenge of how to maximise and evidence educational value through the optimal combination of elements from the portfolio of e-learning technologies increasingly available to educators.
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028619

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Created: Wed, 19 May 2010, 15:06:54 EST by Stuart Palmer

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.