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Glonacalling doctorates?: The international and global connectedness of Australian PhD graduates

Evans, Terry and Macauley, Peter 2010, Glonacalling doctorates?: The international and global connectedness of Australian PhD graduates, in QPR 2010 : Educating researchers for the 21st century : Proceedings of the 2010 Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference, [QPR], [Adelaide, S.Aust], pp. 1-17.

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Title Glonacalling doctorates?: The international and global connectedness of Australian PhD graduates
Author(s) Evans, Terry
Macauley, Peter
Conference name Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference (9th : 2010 : Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 13-15 April 2010
Title of proceedings QPR 2010 : Educating researchers for the 21st century : Proceedings of the 2010 Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference
Publication date 2010
Start page 1
End page 17
Publisher [QPR]
Place of publication [Adelaide, S.Aust]
Keyword(s) Doctoral Education
International Education
Summary Simon Marginson and Gary Rhoades coined the term ‘glonacal’ the express the interconnectedness of global, national and local social relations, especially in terms educational systems and experiences. This paper presents some selected data from a recent ARC Discovery Project entitled Research capacity-building: the development of the Australian PhD programs in national and emerging global contexts. Some of selected data show the extent Australian PhD theses have addressed topics in South and East Asia as an illustration of how research capacity-building may be created in/for Australia through topics which address problems or ideas located in other (in this case East and South Asia) national and local contexts. Other data relate to the international movements of—particularly astronomy and chemistry—PhD graduates out of Australia, some of whom return to Australia. The paper discusses these movements in terms of PhD culture being ‘glonacal’ in nature from its programs and postdoctoral relations.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
ERA Research output type X Not reportable
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, Quality in Postgraduate Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028622

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
Higher Education Research Group
Open Access Collection
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Created: Thu, 20 May 2010, 11:04:37 EST by Terry Evans

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.