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Evidence-informed process to identify policies that will promote a healthy food environment in the Pacific Islands

Snowdon, Wendy, Lawrence, Mark, Schultz, Jimaima, Vivili, Paula and Swinburn, Boyd 2010, Evidence-informed process to identify policies that will promote a healthy food environment in the Pacific Islands, Public health nutrition, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 886-892, doi: 10.1017/S136898001000011X.

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Title Evidence-informed process to identify policies that will promote a healthy food environment in the Pacific Islands
Author(s) Snowdon, Wendy
Lawrence, MarkORCID iD for Lawrence, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-6899-3983
Schultz, Jimaima
Vivili, Paula
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 13
Issue number 6
Start page 886
End page 892
Total pages 7
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2010-06
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Decision making
Problems
Studies
Stakeholders
Diet
Methods
Heart failure
Developing countries--LDCs
Summary Objective: To implement a systematic evidence-informed process to enable Fiji and Tonga to identify the most feasible and targeted policy interventions which would have most impact on diet-related non-communicable diseases.

Design: A multisectoral stakeholder group of policy advisers was formed in each country. They used participatory approaches to identify the problem policies and gaps contributing to an unhealthy food environment. Potential solutions to these problems were then identified, and were assessed by them for feasibility, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and side-effects. Data were gathered on the food and policy environment to support the assessments. A shortlist of preferred policy interventions for action was then developed.

Results: Sixty to eighty policy problems were identified in each country, affecting areas such as trade, agriculture, fisheries and pricing. Up to 100 specific potential policy solutions were then developed in each country. Assessment of the policies highlighted relevant problem areas including poor feasibility, limited effectiveness or cost-effectiveness and serious side-effects. A shortlist of twenty to twenty-three preferred new policy options for action in each country was identified.

Conclusions: Policy environments in these two countries were not conducive to supporting healthy eating. Substantial areas of potential action are possible, but some represent better choices. It is important for countries to consider the impact of non-health policies on diets.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S136898001000011X
Field of Research 111715 Pacific Peoples Health
Socio Economic Objective 920309 Pacific Peoples Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028655

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Created: Mon, 24 May 2010, 13:24:14 EST by Deborah Wittahatchy

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.