Academic libraries

Horn, Anne, Calvert, Philip and Ferguson, Stuart 2009, Academic libraries, in Global library and information science : a textbook for students and educators ; with contributions from Africa, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Latin America and the Carribean, the Middle East and North America, K. G. Saur, München, Germany, pp.243-252.

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Title Academic libraries
Author(s) Horn, Anne
Calvert, Philip
Ferguson, Stuart
Title of book Global library and information science : a textbook for students and educators ; with contributions from Africa, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Latin America and the Carribean, the Middle East and North America
Editor(s) Abdullahi, Ismäil
Publication date 2009
Series IFLA publications ; 136-137.
Chapter number 14
Total chapters 39
Start page 243
End page 252
Total pages 10
Publisher K. G. Saur
Place of Publication München, Germany
Summary Academic libraries are taken to refer here to two particular types of library: university libraries and those libraries which serve the vocational education and training (VET) sector through colleges or institutes of technical and further education (TAFE). (School libraries are dealt with in a separate chapter.) Universities cover undergraduate programs, principally Bachelors degrees, and postgraduate programs such as the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Masters degrees and doctoral programs. The main TAFE awards are Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma. Universities are largely funded by national government - the federal Commonwealth Government in Australia's case - although, as elsewhere, an increasing amount of university funding needs to come from non-government sources, particularly research funding. In Australia institutes of TAFE are funded by state and territory governments, although from 2005 the Federal Government began providing funding for the development of technical colleges outside the TAFE sector that would provide vocational education for secondary school age students. This latter development may well be affected by the change in federal government in late 2007.

The mission for academic libraries globally is to support the teaching, learning and (where appropriate) research activities of their parent institutions. In Australia and New Zealand, universities and their libraries have also had a long tradition of reaching out to the community, contributing to the cultural and intellectual life of the nation. Australia has thirty-nine universities; of which thirty-seven are public institutions and two are private. New Zealand has eight universities. The libraries supporting these institutions are diverse, of high quality and innovative. Based on 2005 figures, there are sixty-eight institutions in Australia's VET sector, with over 1,100 campuses, 1.7 million students and some eleven per cent of Australia's working age population accessing TAPE (Oakley & Vaugha 2007: 43).
ISBN 9783598220425
Language eng
Field of Research 080707 Organisation of Information and Knowledge Resources
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2009, K. G. Saur
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30028964

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Library
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