Socioeconomic position and the tracking of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness from childhood to adulthood

Cleland, Verity J., Ball, Kylie, Magnussen, Costan, Dwyer, Terence and Venn, Alison 2009, Socioeconomic position and the tracking of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness from childhood to adulthood, American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 170, no. 9, pp. 1069-1077.

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Title Socioeconomic position and the tracking of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness from childhood to adulthood
Author(s) Cleland, Verity J.
Ball, Kylie
Magnussen, Costan
Dwyer, Terence
Venn, Alison
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology
Volume number 170
Issue number 9
Start page 1069
End page 1077
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, NC
Publication date 2009-09-18
ISSN 0002-9262
1476-6256
Keyword(s) adult
child
motor activity
physical fitness
prospective studies
social class
social mobility
Summary This study examined the influence of childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and social mobility on activity and fitness tracking from childhood into adulthood. In a prospective cohort of 2,185 Australian adults (aged 26–36 years), first examined in 1985 (at ages 7–15 years), self-reported physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness (subsample only) were measured. SEP measures included retrospectively reported parental education (baseline) and own education (follow-up). There was little evidence of a relation between childhood SEP and activity tracking, but high childhood SEP (maternal education) was associated with a 59% increased likelihood of persistent fitness, and medium childhood SEP (paternal and parental education) was associated with a 33%–36% decreased likelihood of persistent fitness. Upward social mobility was associated with a greater likelihood of increasing activity (38%–49%) and fitness (90%), and persistently high SEP was associated with a greater likelihood of increasing activity (males: 58%) and fitness (males and females combined: 89%). In conclusion, persistently high SEP and upward social mobility were associated with increases in activity and fitness from childhood to adulthood. Findings highlight socioeconomic differentials in activity and fitness patterns and suggest that improvements in education may represent a pathway through which physical activity levels can be increased and health benefits achieved
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029104

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