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Personal, social and environmental correlates of healthy weight status amongst mothers from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods : findings from the READI study

MacFarlane, Abbie, Abbott, Gavin, Crawford, David and Ball, Kylie 2010, Personal, social and environmental correlates of healthy weight status amongst mothers from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods : findings from the READI study, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 7, no. 23, pp. 1-9.

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Title Personal, social and environmental correlates of healthy weight status amongst mothers from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods : findings from the READI study
Author(s) MacFarlane, Abbie
Abbott, Gavin
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 7
Issue number 23
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary Background

Socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers are at high risk of obesity, yet the aetiology of obesity in this group remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine the perceived personal, social and physical environmental factors associated with resilience to obesity among mothers from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.
Methods

Survey data were provided by a cohort of 1840 women aged 18-46 years with dependent children (aged 0-18 years) from 40 urban and 40 rural socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods across Victoria, Australia. Mothers responded to a number of questions relating to personal, social and environmental influences on their physical activity and eating habits. Mothers' weight status was classified as healthy weight (BMI: 18.5-24.99), overweight (BMI: 25-29.99) or obese (BMI: 30+).
Results

Mothers' weight status was bivariably associated with factors from all three domains (personal, social and physical environmental). In a multivariable model, mothers' perceived ability to make time for healthy eating (OR = 1.34) and physical activity (OR = 1.11) despite family commitments, and the frequency with which families ate healthy low-fat foods with mothers (OR = 1.28) remained significantly positively associated with healthy weight status. The frequency with which families encouraged eating healthy low-fat foods remained negatively associated (OR = 0.81) with weight status; ie greater encouragement was associated with less healthy weight status.
Conclusions

Drawing on the characteristics of mothers resilient to obesity might assist in developing intervention strategies to help other mothers in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods to manage their weight. Such strategies might focus on planning for and prioritising time for healthy eating and physical activity behaviours, and including family members in and encouraging family mealtimes.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, MacFarlane et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029107

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.