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Ozbot and haptics : remote surveillance to physical presence

Mullins, James, Fielding, Mick and Nahavandi, Saeid 2009, Ozbot and haptics : remote surveillance to physical presence, in Defence, Security, and Sensing 2009: Displays, Robotics, and Space Technologies, SPIE, Bellingham, Wa, USA, doi: 10.1117/12.817712.

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Title Ozbot and haptics : remote surveillance to physical presence
Author(s) Mullins, James
Fielding, MickORCID iD for Fielding, Mick orcid.org/0000-0001-7569-8499
Nahavandi, SaeidORCID iD for Nahavandi, Saeid orcid.org/0000-0002-0360-5270
Conference name Defence, Security, and Sensing 2009: Displays, Robotics, and Space Technologies
Conference location Orlando, Florida, USA
Conference dates 13-17 Apr. 2009
Title of proceedings Defence, Security, and Sensing 2009: Displays, Robotics, and Space Technologies
Editor(s) Cox, Joseph L.
Motaghedi, Pejmun
Publication date 2009
Series SPIE proceedings v. 7326-7333
Total pages 9
Publisher SPIE
Place of publication Bellingham, Wa, USA
Keyword(s) haptic
IED
robot
stereoscopic
OzBot
Summary This paper reports on robotic and haptic technologies and capabilities developed for the law enforcement and defence community within Australia by the Centre for Intelligent Systems Research (CISR). The OzBot series of small and medium surveillance robots have been designed in Australia and evaluated by law enforcement and defence personnel to determine suitability and ruggedness in a variety of environments. Using custom developed digital electronics and featuring expandable data busses including RS485, I2C, RS232, video and Ethernet, the robots can be directly connected to many off the shelf payloads such as gas sensors, x-ray sources and camera systems including thermal and night vision. Differentiating the OzBot platform from its peers is its ability to be integrated directly with haptic technology or the 'haptic bubble' developed by CISR. Haptic interfaces allow an operator to physically 'feel' remote environments through position-force control and experience realistic force feedback. By adding the capability to remotely grasp an object, feel its weight, texture and other physical properties in real-time from the remote ground control unit, an operator's situational awareness is greatly improved through Haptic augmentation in an environment where remote-system feedback is often limited.
Notes Copyright 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic electronic or print reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
ISBN 9780819476241
Language eng
DOI 10.1117/12.817712
Field of Research 080602 Computer-Human Interaction
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2009, SPIE
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029263

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Intelligent Systems Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.