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Does stress induce salt intake?

Torres, Susan J., Turner, Anne I. and Nowson, Caryl A. 2010, Does stress induce salt intake?, British journal of nutrition, vol. 103, no. 11, pp. 1562-1568.

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Title Does stress induce salt intake?
Author(s) Torres, Susan J.
Turner, Anne I.
Nowson, Caryl A.
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 103
Issue number 11
Start page 1562
End page 1568
Total pages 7
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2010-06
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) chronic stress
salt intake
blood pressure
eating behaviour
Summary Psychological stress is a common feature of modern day societies, and contributes to the global burden of disease. It was proposed by Henry over 20 years ago that the salt intake of a society reflects the level of stress, and that stress, through its effect on increasing salt intake, is an important factor in the development of hypertension. This review evaluates the evidence from animal and human studies to determine if stress does induce a salt appetite and increase salt consumption in human subjects. Findings from animal studies suggest that stress may drive salt intake, with evidence for a potential mechanism via the sympatho-adrenal medullary system and/or the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis. In contrast, in the few laboratory studies conducted in human subjects, none has found that acute stress affects salt intake. However, one study demonstrated that life stress (chronic stress) was associated with increased consumption of snack foods, which included, but not specifically, highly salty snacks. Studies investigating the influence of chronic stress on eating behaviours are required, including consumption of salty foods. From the available evidence, we can conclude that in free-living, Na-replete individuals, consuming Na in excess of physiological requirements, stress is unlikely to be a major contributor to salt intake.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029350

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.