Openly accessible

Identification of depression in diabetes the efficacy of PHQ-9 and HADS-D

Reddy, Prasuna, Philpot, Benjamin, Ford, Dale and Dunbar, James 2010, Identification of depression in diabetes the efficacy of PHQ-9 and HADS-D, British journal of general practice, vol. 60, no. 575, pp. e239-e245.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
reddy-identificationof-2010.pdf Published version application/pdf 176.98KB 39

Title Identification of depression in diabetes the efficacy of PHQ-9 and HADS-D
Author(s) Reddy, Prasuna
Philpot, Benjamin
Ford, Dale
Dunbar, James
Journal name British journal of general practice
Volume number 60
Issue number 575
Start page e239
End page e245
Total pages 7
Publisher Royal College of General Practitioners
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010-06
ISSN 0960-1643
1478-5242
Keyword(s) depression
diabetes
hospital anxiety and depression scale
patient health questionnaire
sleep disturbance
Summary Background
Clinical guidelines advise screening for depression in patients with diabetes. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) are commonly used in primary care.

Aim

To compare the efficacy of HADS-D and PHQ-9 in identifying moderate to severe depression among primary care patients with type 2 diabetes.

Design of study

Self-report postal survey, clinical records assessed by GPs.

Setting

Seven metropolitan and rural general practices in Victoria, Australia.

Method

Postal questionnaires were sent to all patients with diabetes on the registers of seven practices in Victoria. A total of 561 completed postal questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate 47%. Surveys included demographic information, and history of diabetes and depression. Participants completed both the PHQ-9 and HADS-D. Clinical data from patient records included glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and medications.

Results

The proportion of the total sample completing HADS-D was 96.8% compared with 82.4% for PHQ-9. Level of education was unrelated to responses on the HADS-D but was related to completion of the PHQ-9. Using complete data (n = 456) from both measures, 40 responders showed HADS-D scores in the moderate to severe range, compared with 103 cases identified by PHQ-9. Only 35 cases were classified in the moderate to severe category by both the PHQ-9 and HADS-D. Items with the highest proportions of positive responses on the PHQ-9 were related to tiredness and sleeping problems and, on the HADS-D, feeling slowed down.

Conclusion
It may be that the items contributing to the higher prevalence of moderate to severe depression using the PHQ-9 are due to diabetes-related symptoms or sleep disorders.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, British Journal of General Practice
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029366

Connect to link resolver
 
Link to Related Work
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 437 Abstract Views, 39 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 29 Jun 2010, 12:40:21 EST by Liz Jackway

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.