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Factors that predict work ability : incorporating a measure of organisational values towards ageing

Palermo, Josephine, Webber, Lynne, Smith, Kaye and Khor, Anne 2009, Factors that predict work ability : incorporating a measure of organisational values towards ageing. In Kumashiro, Masaharu (ed), Promotion of work ability towards productive aging : selected papers of the 3rd International Symposium on Work Ability, Hanoi, Vietnam, 22-24 October, 2007, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla., pp.45-58.

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Title Factors that predict work ability : incorporating a measure of organisational values towards ageing
Author(s) Palermo, Josephine
Webber, Lynne
Smith, Kaye
Khor, Anne
Title of book Promotion of work ability towards productive aging : selected papers of the 3rd International Symposium on Work Ability, Hanoi, Vietnam, 22-24 October, 2007
Editor(s) Kumashiro, Masaharu
Publication date 2009
Chapter number 2.5
Total chapters 6
Start page 45
End page 58
Total pages 14
Publisher CRC Press
Place of Publication Boca Raton, Fla.
Summary This research conducted in an Australian public sector organisation aimed to identify the main factors that predict work ability for employees. According to Ilmarinen's (1999) model of work ability, an individual's work ability is influenced by their general health, attitudes, values and motivation interacting with workplace and other environmental demands. However what is unknown is the influence of value incongruence (i.e. the lack of fit between individual and organisational values), particularly when that incongruence results in age discrimination. This is important in an Australian context where youth and symbols of youth are over-valued in business environments and where older workers themselves perceive age discrimination as the single most important cause of early exit from the labour force.

109 participants completed a survey about work ability. Differences between work ability and health were not found between older and younger workers suggesting that strategies for improving work ability could be targeted at all employees rather than just older employees. However there were significant differences found between older and younger workers on reasons that would influence employees to stay longer in the organisation. Older workers tended to be more influenced by the provision of less demanding work, and positive attitudes towards older workers. Younger workers tended to be more influenced by opportunities to be employed in another section of the organisation, skills training opportunities and career advancement opportunities.

Results from hierarchical regression analyses suggested that good physical and mental health, and low occupational stress related to workplace culture were significant predictors of increased work ability. Results also suggested that occupational stress is likely to decrease with: high work ability and work satisfaction; and high value congruence. Implications for wellbeing programs to include the development of targeted organisational values are discussed.
ISBN 0415485908
9780415485906
Language eng
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category B1.1 Book chapter
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029492

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Created: Thu, 05 Aug 2010, 12:19:01 EST by Jane Moschetti

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