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Who will be an entrepreneur? How cultural mechanisms and social network structure together influence entrepreneurial participation

Klyver, Kim, Hindle, Kevin and Schøtt, Thomas 2007, Who will be an entrepreneur? How cultural mechanisms and social network structure together influence entrepreneurial participation, in BCERC 2007 : Proceedings of the 2007 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Babson College, Babson Park, Mass., pp. 1-15.

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Title Who will be an entrepreneur? How cultural mechanisms and social network structure together influence entrepreneurial participation
Author(s) Klyver, Kim
Hindle, Kevin
Schøtt, Thomas
Conference name Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference (2007 : Madrid, Spain)
Conference location Madrid, Spain
Conference dates 7-9 Jun. 2007
Title of proceedings BCERC 2007 : Proceedings of the 2007 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2007
Conference series Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference
Start page 1
End page 15
Publisher Babson College
Place of publication Babson Park, Mass.
Summary Using data collected from 35 countries over five years, this study provides an investigation of the combined influence of cultural factors and social network structure on whether or not an individual, anywhere in the world, becomes an entrepreneur. Results show that knowing someone who has started a business recently, across the world, has a significant impact on entrepreneurship participation. Regarding the potential cultural influences, it seems that importance attached to personally knowing entrepreneurs differs significantly between individuals operating in different cultures. In cultures with high power distance, personally knowing a person who recently started a business is relatively less important as a driver of entrepreneurship participation compared to cultures with low power distance. On the other hand, in cultures where the Hofstede’s ‘masculinity’construct predominates, it is more important than in cultures characterised by ‘femininity’.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, The authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029575

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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