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How to write an unsuccessful entrepreneurial business plan : content analysis of the normative literature reveals a flawed paradigm

Hindle, Kevin 1997, How to write an unsuccessful entrepreneurial business plan : content analysis of the normative literature reveals a flawed paradigm, in ANZAM 1997 : Management theory and practice : moving to a new era : Proceedings of the 11th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management conference 1997, Macmillan Education Australia, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-21.

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Title How to write an unsuccessful entrepreneurial business plan : content analysis of the normative literature reveals a flawed paradigm
Author(s) Hindle, Kevin
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management. Conference (11th : 1997 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 3-6 Dec. 1997
Title of proceedings ANZAM 1997 : Management theory and practice : moving to a new era : Proceedings of the 11th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management conference 1997
Editor(s) Griffin, Gerard
Publication date 1997
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages xiv, 378 p.
Publisher Macmillan Education Australia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) entrepreneurship
planning
entrepreneurial business planning
paradigm
Summary The study's aim was to investigate whether an Entrepreneurial Business Planning (EBP) paradigm could be discovered as a body of core, common maxims within the normative EBP literature (works of the 'how-to-write-a-successful-new-venture-business-plan' genre). It employed content analysis techniques adapted mainly from the methodological prescriptions of Krippendorf (1980) and Carney (1972). The textual investigation produced a comprehensive, quantitative data base capable of sufficient interpretative richness to discover that an established Entrepreneurial Business Planning paradigm does exist. Its major elements embrace two key assumptions, four strong mandates and four weaker mandates.

The discovery is significant for two main reasons. First, it provides a formally-researched, explicitly-articulated EBP paradigm. This can replace the anecdotal, unarticulated assumption (implicit in most of the normative EBP literature) that an EBP paradigm 'probably exists'. Second, the research redresses some of the imbalance between entrepreneurship teaching- where Entrepreneurial Business Planning is at the core of international curricula - and entrepreneurship research which has virtually ignored EBP as a topic worthy of serious scrutiny. A firm basis for critical, scholarly exploration of the neglected EBP field is now established. This takes the theory and practice of EBP into a new era beginning with recognition that the discovered EBP paradigm is badly flawed and likely, if blindly applied, to lead to the writing of unsuccessful business plans.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 0732950457
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©1997, the author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029667

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.