Crash landing at INSEAD : initiating a grounded theory of the pedagogical effectiveness of simulation games for teaching aspects of entrepreneurship

Hindle, Kevin, Anghern, Albert and Wolfe, Joseph 1998, Crash landing at INSEAD : initiating a grounded theory of the pedagogical effectiveness of simulation games for teaching aspects of entrepreneurship, in Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 1998 : proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Babson Park, Mass., pp. 1-24.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Crash landing at INSEAD : initiating a grounded theory of the pedagogical effectiveness of simulation games for teaching aspects of entrepreneurship
Author(s) Hindle, Kevin
Anghern, Albert
Wolfe, Joseph
Conference name Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research. Conference (18th : 1998 : Fontainebleau, France)
Conference location Fontainebleau, France
Conference dates 1998
Title of proceedings Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 1998 : proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference
Editor(s) Reynolds, Paul D.
Publication date 1998
Start page 1
End page 24
Publisher Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
Place of publication Babson Park, Mass.
Summary A practical teaching difficulty arising in a conducive environment provided opportunity to turn the particular problem into a case study with generic implications. Little research has been conducted on the use or effectiveness of simulation games for teaching entrepreneurship. In the context of established literature critiquing the effectiveness of simulation games as teaching devices in managerial contexts and at a point where problems in using a simulation game as part of entrepreneurship course became evident, the authors designed and executed a single-case research project to generate initial theoretical propositions about the pedagogical effectiveness of simulation games for teaching various concepts and aspects of entrepreneurship. The case analysed the perceived learning environment created when the Sky-High simulation was played by 41 MBA students taking an elective entrepreneurship course at INSEAD. The research design embodied the established methodological principles specified by Yin (1989), for effective case research. Theory building was based upon the grounded-theorizing procedures articulated by Glaser and Strauss (1967). Analysis and synthesis produced a grounded theory, in the form of a normative argument, containing four attribute categories and associated properties required of a simulation game to make it an efficacious teaching device in entrepreneurship contexts. The establishment of this grounded theory has made it both desirable and feasible to contemplate creation of an ISO quality standard for educational simulation games.
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029670

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Management and Marketing
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 327 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 16 Aug 2010, 10:00:28 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.