Openly accessible

Are workers with a disability less productive or less understood? An empirical investigation from an entrepreneurial business planning perspective

Hindle, Kevin, Noble, Jock and Phillips, Brian 1999, Are workers with a disability less productive or less understood? An empirical investigation from an entrepreneurial business planning perspective, in ANZAM 1999 : Proceedings of the 1999 Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management conference, ANZAM, [Lindfield, N.S.W.], pp. 1-37.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hindle-productivityofworkers-post-1999.pdf Author's post print application/pdf 233.86KB 257

Title Are workers with a disability less productive or less understood? An empirical investigation from an entrepreneurial business planning perspective
Alternative title The productivity of workers with a disability : evidence dispels past myth ; entrepreneurship plans future reality
Author(s) Hindle, Kevin
Noble, Jock
Phillips, Brian
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management. Conference (1999 : Hobart, Tasmania)
Conference location Hobart, Tasmania
Conference dates 1-4 Dec. 1999
Title of proceedings ANZAM 1999 : Proceedings of the 1999 Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management conference
Publication date 1999
Start page 1
End page 37
Publisher ANZAM
Place of publication [Lindfield, N.S.W.]
Keyword(s) disability
workers
productivity
entrepreneurship
entrepreneurial business planning
Summary This study investigated selected work-performance data of a large call centre using the entrepreneurial business planning paradigm as a theoretical framework and tested the hypothesis that levels of productivity would be different for each group between workers with a disability and workers without a disability. On five measures of productivity, no significant differences were discernible but on a sixth measure, length of employment, it was found that disability workers remained in employment significantly longer. These results strongly refute the ‘intuitive wisdom’ that workers with a disability are less productive. The results support a growing body of corporate experience and descriptive research indicating that workers with a disability perform as well as or better than their non-disability colleagues. Yet workers with a disability remain disproportionately under-employed. The key to translating the growing evidence of this research into higher levels of employment of workers with disabilities will depend upon employers adopting an entrepreneurial approach to the planning of human resource management.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 0859018520
9780859018524
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029671

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 319 Abstract Views, 257 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 16 Aug 2010, 10:00:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.