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Comparison of energy expenditure in adolescents when playing new generation and sedentary computer games: cross sectional study

Graves, Lee, Stratton, Gareth, Ridgers, N. D. and Cable, N. T. 2007, Comparison of energy expenditure in adolescents when playing new generation and sedentary computer games: cross sectional study, BMJ : British medical journal, vol. 335, no. 7633, pp. 1282-1284, doi: 10.1136/bmj.39415.632951.80.

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Title Comparison of energy expenditure in adolescents when playing new generation and sedentary computer games: cross sectional study
Alternative title Energy expenditure in adolescents playing new generation computer games
Author(s) Graves, Lee
Stratton, Gareth
Ridgers, N. D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, N. D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Cable, N. T.
Journal name BMJ : British medical journal
Volume number 335
Issue number 7633
Start page 1282
End page 1284
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007-12-20
ISSN 0959-535X
1468-5833
Summary Objective : To compare the energy expenditure of adolescents when playing sedentary and new generation active computer games.

Design : Cross sectional comparison of four computer games.

Setting : Research laboratories.

Participants : Six boys and five girls aged 13-15 years.

Procedure : Participants were fitted with a monitoring device validated to predict energy expenditure. They played four computer games for 15 minutes each. One of the games was sedentary (XBOX 360) and the other three were active (Wii Sports).

Main outcome measure : Predicted energy expenditure, compared using repeated measures analysis of variance.

Results : Mean (standard deviation) predicted energy expenditure when playing Wii Sports bowling (190.6 (22.2) kJ/kg/min), tennis (202.5 (31.5) kJ/kg/min), and boxing (198.1 (33.9) kJ/kg/min) was significantly greater than when playing sedentary games (125.5 (13.7) kJ/kg/min) (P<0.001). Predicted energy expenditure was at least 65.1 (95% confidence interval 47.3 to 82.9) kJ/kg/min greater when playing active rather than sedentary games.

Conclusions :
Playing new generation active computer games uses significantly more energy than playing sedentary computer games but not as much energy as playing the sport itself. The energy used when playing active Wii Sports games was not of high enough intensity to contribute towards the recommended daily amount of exercise in children.
Notes Title on PDF is Energy expenditure in adolescents playing new generation computer games, however the html version is Comparison of energy expenditure in adolescents when playing new generation and sedentary computer games: cross sectional study
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmj.39415.632951.80
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, The authors. This article has been published in the BMJ and can also be viewed on the journal’s website at www.bmj.com.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30029960

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.