Openly accessible

Perceived neighborhood environment and park use as mediators of the effect of area socio-economic status on walking behaviors

Leslie, Evie, Cerin, Ester and Kremer, Peter 2010, Perceived neighborhood environment and park use as mediators of the effect of area socio-economic status on walking behaviors, Journal of physical activity & health, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 802-810.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
leslie-perceivedneighborhood-2010.pdf Published version application/pdf 410.38KB 239

Title Perceived neighborhood environment and park use as mediators of the effect of area socio-economic status on walking behaviors
Author(s) Leslie, Evie
Cerin, Ester
Kremer, Peter
Journal name Journal of physical activity & health
Volume number 7
Issue number 6
Start page 802
End page 810
Total pages 9
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2010-11
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) adults
social disadvantage
environmental attributes
parks
walking behavior
Summary Background: Access to local parks can affect walking levels. Neighborhood environment and park use may influence relationships between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and walking.

Methods: Self-report data on perceived park features, neighborhood environment, park use, neighborhood walking and sociodemographics
were obtained from a sample of Australian adults, living in high/low SES areas. Surveys were mailed to 250 randomly selected households within 500m of 12 matched parks. Mediating effects of perceived environment attributes and park use on relationships between area-SES and walking were examined.

Results: Mean frequency of local park use was higher for high-SES residents (4.36 vs 3.16 times/wk, P < .01), who also reported higher levels of park safety, maintenance, attractiveness, opportunities for socialization, and neighborhood crime safety, aesthetics, and traffic safety. Safety and opportunity for socialization were independently positively related to monthly frequency of visits to a local park which, in turn, was positively associated with walking for recreation and total walking. Residents of higher SES areas reported an average 22% (95% CI: 5%, 37%) more weekly minutes of recreational walking than their low SES counterparts.

Conclusion:
Residents of high-SES areas live in environments that promote park use, which positively contributes to their weekly amounts of overall and recreational walking.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030468

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 354 Abstract Views, 239 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 13 Oct 2010, 12:07:39 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.