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Perceived control and subjective wellbeing in older adults

de Quadros-Wander, Shikkiah 2009, Perceived control and subjective wellbeing in older adults, D.Psych. (Clinical) thesis, School of Psychology, Deakin University.


Title Perceived control and subjective wellbeing in older adults
Alternative title The integration of ACT and CBT in clinical practice
Author de Quadros-Wander, Shikkiah
Institution Deakin University
School School of Psychology
Faculty Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing and Behavioural Sciences
Degree name D.Psych. (Clinical)
Date submitted 2009
Keyword(s) Well-being - Evaluation
Quality of life - Evaluation
Older people - Psychology
Cognitive therapy - Practice
Acceptance and commitment therapy - Practice
Summary Across age, the ability to accept what cannot be changed increases while feelings of control remain stable. The growth of acceptance preserves, rather than compensates for, older adults' sense of being in control. In later life, acceptance and control appear to operate together to maintain wellbeing. The professional portfolio uses four case studies to illustrate how Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) programs can be reinterpreted through and Acceptance and Committment Therapy (ACT) framework and elements of both employed within a single therapeutic program.
Notes Degree conferred 2010.
Language eng
Description of original 2 v. ; 30 cm.
Dewey Decimal Classification 158
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030535

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Created: Fri, 15 Oct 2010, 14:11:31 EST

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