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Last interglacial climates of south-eastern Australia : plant and beetle-based reconstructions from Yarra Creek, King Island, Tasmania

Porch, Nick, Jordan, Gregory J., Price, David M., Barnes, Richard W., Macphail, Mike K. and Pemberton, Mike 2009, Last interglacial climates of south-eastern Australia : plant and beetle-based reconstructions from Yarra Creek, King Island, Tasmania, Quaternary science reviews, vol. 28, no. 27-28, pp. 3197-3210, doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.09.023.

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Title Last interglacial climates of south-eastern Australia : plant and beetle-based reconstructions from Yarra Creek, King Island, Tasmania
Author(s) Porch, NickORCID iD for Porch, Nick orcid.org/0000-0001-7179-3843
Jordan, Gregory J.
Price, David M.
Barnes, Richard W.
Macphail, Mike K.
Pemberton, Mike
Journal name Quaternary science reviews
Volume number 28
Issue number 27-28
Start page 3197
End page 3210
Total pages 14
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2009-12
ISSN 0277-3791
1873-457X
Summary This paper explores the palaeoclimatic significance of a fossil plant and insect record from Yarra Creek, on King Island, between Tasmania and the Australian mainland. The record dates, based upon a thermoluminescence chronology and other evidence, to Marine Isotope Stage 5 (MIS 5); the exact timing is impossible to ascertain given the resolution of the thermoluminescence results and the presence of an unconformity in the dated section. The presence of a cool-temperate rainforest flora, outside its modern range, and other independent evidence, suggest the sequence may represent the last interglacial (MIS 5e) rather than a later MIS 5 substage. Using coexistence methods that compare modern climatic ranges of the taxa in the assemblage we reconstruct independent beetle and plant based annual and seasonal temperate and precipitation parameters. The results imply the assemblage was deposited under a wetter summer climate and suggest conditions of enhanced temperature seasonality. It is probable that enhanced temperature seasonality is a methodological artefact reflecting the rarity of extremely equable climates (like King Island) in modern climate space. This would indicate a limitation of most methods of palaeoclimatic reconstruction that rely on modern datasets – it is only possible to reconstruct past climates as being within the range of values in that currently exist in modern climate space.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.09.023
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030868

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