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Is dietary management a responsibility of general practitioners? The views of Victorian general practitioners

Pomeroy, Sylvia 2008, Is dietary management a responsibility of general practitioners? The views of Victorian general practitioners, in GP & PHC 2008 : General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Proceedings : Health for All?, Primary Health Care Research & Information Service, [Hobart, Tas.].

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Title Is dietary management a responsibility of general practitioners? The views of Victorian general practitioners
Author(s) Pomeroy, Sylvia
Conference name General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference (2008 : Hobart, Tas.)
Conference location Hobart, Tas.
Conference dates 4-6 Jun 2008
Title of proceedings GP & PHC 2008 : General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Proceedings : Health for All?
Publication date 2008
Publisher Primary Health Care Research & Information Service
Place of publication [Hobart, Tas.]
Summary Rationale : Australia is experiencing an evolving healthcare system, resulting in an aim of systematic managed care for patients with chronic disease. One outcome has been debate on doctors' dietary management responsibilities.
Aim : To identify general practitioners' perceptions of their dietary management responsibilities for adult cardiac patients.
Methods : A Two phase study was conducted. First, semi-structured interviews with 30 Melbourne general practitioners were conducted to gather preliminary information about dietary management. The results informed a questionnaire for the second phase. This was completed by 248 general practitioners (30%) in Victoria.
Principal findings : Themes arising in interviews, and also supported by cross-sectional survey showed that doctors perceive themselves as filling one or more of three roles. The majority (87.4%) endorsed an 'Influencing' role, 27.4% endorsed 'Dietary Educator' and 44.0% a 'Coordinator' role. The Influencer role was characterised by encouragement of dietary behaviour change, such as discussing benefits and consequences of inaction to dietary change. The Educator role was characterised by the provision of a range of behaviour change strategies- 'how to' achieve change. 'Coordinators' reported the provision of dietary counselling belonged to dietitians alone.
Implications : The results indicate doctors' awareness of need for patients' dietary education should be increased. This could be accomplished by one-on-one education. Patients' access to dietary education should also be facilitated by doctors' referring on. Embedding dietary management protocols in doctors' managed care templates could improve patients' access to dietary education and enhance doctor's collaborative roles.
Presentation type : Paper
Session theme : Getting Evidence into Practice 2
Language eng
Field of Research 110199 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030881

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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