A grounded theory of intuition among occupational therapists in mental health practice

Chaffey, Lisa, Unsworth, Carolyn and Fossey, Ellie 2010, A grounded theory of intuition among occupational therapists in mental health practice, British journal of occupational therapy, vol. 73, no. 7, pp. 300-308.

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Title A grounded theory of intuition among occupational therapists in mental health practice
Author(s) Chaffey, Lisa
Unsworth, Carolyn
Fossey, Ellie
Journal name British journal of occupational therapy
Volume number 73
Issue number 7
Start page 300
End page 308
Total pages 9
Publisher College of Occupational Therapists
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010-07
ISSN 0308-0226
1477-6006
Keyword(s) Clinical reasoning
occupational therapy practice
mental health practice
expertise
qualitative research
intuition
Summary Objectives: This study aimed to explore occupational therapists’ understanding and use of intuition in mental health practice.
Method: Using a grounded theory approach, a theoretical sample of nine occupational therapists practising in mental health settings participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method.
Findings: Intuition was found to be embedded within clinical reasoning. From the data, intuition was defined as knowledge without conscious awareness of reasoning. The participants viewed intuition as elusive and underground, and suggested that professional experience led to a more comfortable use of intuition. Using intuition relied on therapists’ understanding of their own and others’ emotions, and intuition partnered analysis within their clinical reasoning. A grounded theory of the use of intuition in mental health settings is proposed.
Conclusion: Occupational therapists practising in mental health settings understand intuition to be an instinctive understanding of situations, resulting from their professional experience and the understanding of emotions.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl Physiotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, College of Occupational Therapists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030957

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Fri, 29 Oct 2010, 10:41:08 EST by Penny Andrews

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.