Parenting, family functioning and lifestyle in a new culture : the case of African migrants in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Renzaho, André M. N., Green, Julie, Mellor, David and Swinburn, Boyd 2011, Parenting, family functioning and lifestyle in a new culture : the case of African migrants in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Child and family social work, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 228-240, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2206.2010.00736.x.

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Title Parenting, family functioning and lifestyle in a new culture : the case of African migrants in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Renzaho, André M. N.
Green, Julie
Mellor, DavidORCID iD for Mellor, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5007-5906
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Child and family social work
Volume number 16
Issue number 2
Start page 228
End page 240
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2011-05
ISSN 1356-7500
1365-2206
Keyword(s) african migrants
family functioning
intergenerational acculturation
lifestyle changes
parenting
Summary This study documented the parenting styles among African migrants now living in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, and assessed how intergenerational issues related to parenting in a new culture impact on family functioning and the modification of lifestyles. A total of 10 focus group discussions (five with parents and five with 13–17-year-old children; N = 85 participants) of 1.5–2 hours duration were conducted with Sudanese, Somali and Ethiopian migrant families. The analysis identified three discrete themes: (i) parenting-related issues; (ii) family functioning and family relations; and (iii) lifestyle changes and health. African migrant parents were restrictive in their parenting; controlled children's behaviours and social development through strict boundary-setting and close monitoring of interests, activities, and friends; and adopted a hierarchical approach to decision-making while discouraging autonomy among their offspring. Programmes seeking to improve the health and welfare of African migrants in their host countries need to accommodate the cultural and social dimensions that shape their lives. Such programmes may need to be so broad as to apply an acculturation lens to planning, and to assist young people, parents and families in addressing intergenerational issues related to raising children and growing up in a different social and cultural milieu.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2206.2010.00736.x
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920503 Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30030973

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