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Fundamental movement skills in children and adolescents : review of associated health benefits

Lubans, David R., Morgan, Philip J., Cliff, Dylan P., Barnett, Lisa M. and Okely, Anthony D. 2010, Fundamental movement skills in children and adolescents : review of associated health benefits, Sports medicine, vol. 40, no. 12, pp. 1019-1035.

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Title Fundamental movement skills in children and adolescents : review of associated health benefits
Author(s) Lubans, David R.
Morgan, Philip J.
Cliff, Dylan P.
Barnett, Lisa M.
Okely, Anthony D.
Journal name Sports medicine
Volume number 40
Issue number 12
Start page 1019
End page 1035
Total pages 17
Publisher ADIS Press Ltd.
Place of publication Auckland, N.Z.
Publication date 2010-12
ISSN 0112-1642
1179-2035
Summary The mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) has been purported as contributing to children's physical, cognitive and social development and is thought to provide the foundation for an active lifestyle. Commonly developed in childhood and subsequently refined into context- and sport-specific skills, they include locomotor (e.g. running and hopping), manipulative or object control (e.g. catching and throwing) and stability (e.g. balancing and twisting) skills. The rationale for promoting the development of FMS in childhood relies on the existence of evidence on the current or future benefits associated with the acquisition of FMS proficiency. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between FMS competency and potential health benefits in children and adolescents. Benefits were defined in terms of psychological, physiological and behavioural outcomes that can impact public health. A systematic search of six electronic databases (EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and SportDiscus) was conducted on 22 June 2009. Included studies were cross-sectional, longitudinal or experimental studies involving healthy children or adolescents (aged 3–18 years) that quantitatively analysed the relationship between FMS competency and potential benefits. The search identified 21 articles examining the relationship between FMS competency and eight potential benefits (i.e. global self-concept, perceived physical competence, cardio-respiratory fitness [CRF], muscular fitness, weight status, flexibility, physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviour). We found strong evidence for a positive association between FMS competency and physical activity in children and adolescents. There was also a positive relationship between FMS competency and CRF and an inverse association between FMS competency and weight status. Due to an inadequate number of studies, the relationship between FMS competency and the remaining benefits was classified as uncertain. More longitudinal and intervention research examining the relationship between FMS competency and potential psychological, physiological and behavioural outcomes in children and adolescents is recommended.
Language eng
Field of Research 110603 Motor Control
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, ADIS Press Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031139

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.