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Building equitable literate futures : home and school computer-mediated literacy practices and disadvantage

Snyder, Ilana, Angus, Lawrence and Sutherland-Smith, Wendy 2002, Building equitable literate futures : home and school computer-mediated literacy practices and disadvantage, in AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty : AARE 2002 conference papers, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic..

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Title Building equitable literate futures : home and school computer-mediated literacy practices and disadvantage
Author(s) Snyder, Ilana
Angus, Lawrence
Sutherland-Smith, WendyORCID iD for Sutherland-Smith, Wendy orcid.org/0000-0003-4589-9323
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2002 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 1-5 Dec. 2002
Title of proceedings AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty : AARE 2002 conference papers
Publication date 2002
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Summary This paper examines the complex connections between literacy practices, the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and disadvantage. It reports the findings of a year-long study which investigated the ways in which four families use ICTs to engage with formal and informal literacy learning in home and school settings. The research set out to explore what it is about computer-mediated literacy practices at home and at school in disadvantaged communities that make a difference in school success. The findings demonstrate that the 'socialisation' of the technology - its appropriation into existing family norms, values and lifestyles - varied from family to family. Having access to ICTs at home was not sufficient for the young people and their families to overcome the so-called 'digital divide'. Clearly, we are seeing shifts in the meaning of 'disadvantage' in a globalised world mediated by the use of new technologies. New definitions of disadvantage that take account not only of access to the new technologies but also include calibrated understandings of what constitutes the access are required. The article concludes that old inequalities have not disappeared, but are playing out in new ways in the context of the networked society.
Notes Since submitted to AARE, this paper has been published in the Cambridge Journal of Education 32, 3, 367-383. Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.AARE requests directions to their homepage should be included http://www.aare.edu.au/index.htm
Language eng
Field of Research 130199 Education systems not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 939903 Equity and Access to Education
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2002, Australian Association for Research in Education
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031159

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.