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Writing as tribal practice : revisiting online collaborative writing

Sutherland-Smith, Wendy 2006, Writing as tribal practice : revisiting online collaborative writing, in AARE Conference Paper Abstracts; 2006, Australian Association for Research in Education, Adelaide, S.A., pp. 1-11.

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Title Writing as tribal practice : revisiting online collaborative writing
Author(s) Sutherland-Smith, WendyORCID iD for Sutherland-Smith, Wendy orcid.org/0000-0003-4589-9323
Conference name Australian Association of Research in Education. International Conference (2006 : Adelaide, S.A.)
Conference location Adelaide, S.A.
Conference dates 27 Nov.-1 Dec. 2006
Title of proceedings AARE Conference Paper Abstracts; 2006
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Adelaide, S.A.
Keyword(s) New pedagogies
Summary Many teachers encourage sharing ideas and knowledge through collaborative group writing to build self-confidence in developing writers. However, some students do not appear to gain a sense of belonging in the collaborative experience. This evolving study explores online collaborative writing with the purpose of creating a 'third author' - the group (tribal) voice. One aim is to reclaim writing as a conscious collaborative act where meaning is attained only at the end of the thought-sharing process. Therefore, the process of writing is seen as more important than the product. A further aim is to observe how intensive writing collaboration will affect both the writers and the writing during the process. A group of language teachers from Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and the USA meet every two weeks in cyberspace for a two-hour intensive writing session. The group has met for the past three months. Different discourses appear to be fusing into a metamorphosed new hybrid author - the tribal group voice. These early findings suggest that such practices may assist learners who experience difficulty entering or contributing to collaborative writing or group-work tasks. Additionally, online group work may benefit, as no physical human contact exists to gain a sense of 'group'.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.AARE requests directions to their homepage should be included http://www.aare.edu.au/index.htm
Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, Australian Association for Research in Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031164

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.