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Who is eating where? Findings from the SESAW study

Thornton, Lukar E., Crawford, David A. and Ball, Kylie 2011, Who is eating where? Findings from the SESAW study, Public health nutrition, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 523-531.

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Title Who is eating where? Findings from the SESAW study
Author(s) Thornton, Lukar E.
Crawford, David A.
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 14
Issue number 3
Start page 523
End page 531
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2011-03-01
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Eating behaviours
Fast food
Socio-economic position
Summary Objective: Foods prepared outside of the home have been linked to less-than-ideal nutrient profiles for health. We examine whether the locations where meals are prepared and consumed are associated with socio-economic predictors among women.
Design: A cross-sectional study using self-reported data. We examined multiple locations where meals are prepared and consumed: (i) at home; (ii) fast food eaten at home; (iii) fast food eaten at the restaurant; (iv) total fast food; (v) non-fast-food restaurant meals eaten at home; (vi) non-fast-food restaurant meals eaten at the restaurant; and (vii) all non-fast-food restaurant meals. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine whether frequent consumption of meals from these sources varied by level of education, occupation, household income and area-level disadvantage.
Setting: Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia.
Subjects: A total of 1328 women from forty-five neighbourhoods randomly sampled for the SocioEconomic Status and Activity in Women study.
Results: Those with higher educational qualifications or who were not in the workforce (compared with those in professional employment) were more likely to report frequent consumption of meals prepared and consumed at home. High individual and area-level socio-economic characteristics were associated with a lower likelihood of frequent consumption of fast food and a higher likelihood of frequent consumption of meals from non-fast-food sources. The strength and significance of relationships varied by place of consumption.
Conclusions: The source of meal preparation and consumption varied by socioeconomic predictors. This has implications for policy makers who need to continue to campaign to make healthy alternatives available in out-of-home food sources.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031191

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.