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Neurophysiological responses after short-term strength training of the biceps brachii muscle

Kidgell, Dawson J., Stokes, Mark A., Castricum, Troy J. and Pearce, Alan J. 2010, Neurophysiological responses after short-term strength training of the biceps brachii muscle, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 24, no. 11, pp. 3123-3132.

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Title Neurophysiological responses after short-term strength training of the biceps brachii muscle
Author(s) Kidgell, Dawson J.
Stokes, Mark A.
Castricum, Troy J.
Pearce, Alan J.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 24
Issue number 11
Start page 3123
End page 3132
Total pages 10
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Place of publication Lincoln, Neb.
Publication date 2010-11
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Keyword(s) transcranial magnetic stimulation
controlled strength training
biceps brachii
electromyography
corticospinal
Summary The neural adaptations that mediate the increase in strength in the early phase of a strength training program are not well understood; however, changes in neural drive and corticospinal excitability have been hypothesized. To determine the neural adaptations to strength training, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to compare the effect of strength training of the right elbow flexor muscles on the functional properties of the corticospinal pathway. Motorevoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right biceps brachii (BB) muscle from 23 individuals (training group; n = 13 and control group; n = 10) before and after 4 weeks of progressive overload strength training at 80% of 1-repetition maximum (1 RM). The TMS was delivered at 10% of the root mean square electromyographic signal (rmsEMG) obtained from a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at intensities of 5% of stimulator output below active motor threshold (AMT) until saturation of the MEP (MEP maxl. Strength training resulted in a 28% (p = 0.0001) increase in 1 RM strength, and this was accompanied by a 53% increase (p = 0.05) in the amplitude of the MEP at AMT; 33% (p = 0.05) increase in MEP at 20% above AMT, and a 38% increase at MEPmax (p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in the estimated slope (p = 0.4 7) or peak slope of the stimulus-response curve for the left primary motor cortex (M1) after strength training (p = 0.61). These results demonstrate that heavy-load isotonic strength training alters neural transmission via the corticospinal pathway projecting to the motoneurons controlling BB and in part underpin the strength changes observed in this study.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 110603 Motor Control
Socio Economic Objective 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031261

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.