Associations between intrapersonal and neighborhood environmental characteristics and cycling for transport and recreation in adults : baseline results from the RESIDE study

Titze, Sylvia, Giles-Corti, Billie, Knuiman, Matthew W., Pikora, Terri J., Timperio, Anna, Bull, Fiona C. and van Niel, Kimberly 2010, Associations between intrapersonal and neighborhood environmental characteristics and cycling for transport and recreation in adults : baseline results from the RESIDE study, Journal of physical activity & health, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 423-431.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Associations between intrapersonal and neighborhood environmental characteristics and cycling for transport and recreation in adults : baseline results from the RESIDE study
Author(s) Titze, Sylvia
Giles-Corti, Billie
Knuiman, Matthew W.
Pikora, Terri J.
Timperio, Anna
Bull, Fiona C.
van Niel, Kimberly
Journal name Journal of physical activity & health
Volume number 7
Issue number 4
Start page 423
End page 431
Total pages 9
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2010-07
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) bicycling
built environment
ecological model
public health
Summary Background: This study investigated the relationship between individual and neighborhood environmental factors and cycling for transport and for recreation among adults living in Perth, Western Australia.
Methods: Baseline cross-sectional data from 1813 participants (40.5% male; age range 18 to 78 years) in the Residential Environment (RESIDE) project were analyzed. The questionnaire included information on cycling behavior and on cycling-specific individual, social environmental, and neighborhood environmental attributes. Cycling for transport and recreation were dichotomized as whether or not individuals cycled in a usual week.
Results: Among the individual factors, positive attitudes toward cycling and perceived behavioral control increased the odds of cycling for transport and for recreation. Among the neighborhood environmental attributes, leafy and attractive neighborhoods, access to bicycle/walking paths, the presence of traffic slowing devices and having many 4-way street intersections were positively associated with cycling for transport. Many alternative routes in the local area increased the odds of cycling for recreation.
Conclusions: Effective strategies for increasing cycling (particularly cycling for transport) may include incorporating supportive environments such as creating leafy and attractive neighborhood surroundings, low traffic speed, and increased street connectivity, in addition to campaigns aimed at strengthening positive attitudes and confidence to cycle.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031299

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 314 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 23 Nov 2010, 14:23:54 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.