Why do some socioeconomically disadvantaged women eat better than others? An investigation of the personal, social and environmental correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption

Williams, Lauren, Ball, Kylie and Crawford, David 2010, Why do some socioeconomically disadvantaged women eat better than others? An investigation of the personal, social and environmental correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption, Appetite, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 441-446.

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Title Why do some socioeconomically disadvantaged women eat better than others? An investigation of the personal, social and environmental correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption
Author(s) Williams, Lauren
Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 55
Issue number 3
Start page 441
End page 446
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier BV
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010-12
ISSN 0195-6663
1095-8304
Keyword(s) fruit consumption
vegetable consumption
socioeconomic status
socioeconomic position
environmental determinants of nutrition
nutrition
disadvantaged women
Summary The purpose of this paper was to examine the contribution of individual, social and environmental factors to predicting fruit and vegetable consumption among women of low socioeconomic position (SEP). An Australian community sample of 355 women of low SEP provided survey data on sociodemographic information, diet (fruit and vegetable consumption), and various cognitive, behavioural, social and perceived environmental influences on healthy eating. Information on the availability and accessibility of major chain supermarkets and fruit and vegetable stores from participant's residence was collected through objective audits. Women who were older, dieting to lose weight, had a greater taste preference for fruit and perceived the cost of fruit to be lower were more likely to be high fruit consumers. Women who had a high BMI were more likely to be high vegetable consumers. Women who perceived a greater availability of healthy foods in their neighbourhoods were more likely to be high fruit and vegetable consumers. Strategies aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among low SEP women should focus on modifying perceptions about the cost, availability and taste of fruits and vegetables. Tailoring nutrition interventions to accommodate differences in age, weight-control practices and weight status may also prove beneficial.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031307

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