Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women : the AusDiab study

Clark, Bronwyn Kay, Sugiyama, Takemi, Healy, Genevieve N., Salmon, Jo, Dunstan, David W, Shaw, Jonathan E., Zimmet, Paul Z. and Owen, Neville 2010, Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women : the AusDiab study, Journal of physical activity & health, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 595-601.

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Title Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women : the AusDiab study
Author(s) Clark, Bronwyn Kay
Sugiyama, Takemi
Healy, Genevieve N.
Salmon, Jo
Dunstan, David W
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Owen, Neville
Journal name Journal of physical activity & health
Volume number 7
Issue number 5
Start page 595
End page 601
Total pages 7
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2010-09
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) television
gender
demographics
AusDiab
Summary Background: Sedentary behaviors, particularly television viewing (TV) time, are associated with adverse health outcomes in adults, independent of physical activity levels. These associations are stronger and more consistent for women than for men. Methods: Multivariate regression models examined the sociodemographic correlates of 2 categories of TV time (≥2 hours/day and ≥4 hours/day); in a large, population-based sample of Australian adults (4950 men, 6001 women; mean age 48.1 years, range 25-91) who participated in the 1999/2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. Results: Some 46% of men and 40% of women watched ≥ 2 hours TV/day; 9% and 6% respectively watched ≥ 4 hours/day. For both men and women, ≥2 hours TV/day was associated with less than tertiary education, living outside of state capital cities, and having no paid employment. For women, mid and older age (45-64 and 65+) were also significant correlates of ≥2 hours TV/day. Similar patterns of association were observed in those viewing ≥4 hours/day. Conclusions: Prolonged TV time is associated with indices of social disadvantage and older age. These findings can inform the understanding of potential contextual influences and guide preventive initiatives.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology 50%
111716 Preventive Medicine 50%
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031413

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