Skipping breakfast : longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in the childhood determinants of adult health study

Smith, Kylie J., Gall, Seana L., McNaughton, Sarah A., Blizzard, Leigh, Dwyer, Terence and Venn, Alison J. 2010, Skipping breakfast : longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in the childhood determinants of adult health study, American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 1316-1325.

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Title Skipping breakfast : longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in the childhood determinants of adult health study
Author(s) Smith, Kylie J.
Gall, Seana L.
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Blizzard, Leigh
Dwyer, Terence
Venn, Alison J.
Journal name American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 92
Issue number 6
Start page 1316
End page 1325
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2010-12
ISSN 0002-9165
1938-3207
Summary Background: The long-term effects of skipping breakfast on cardiometabolic health are not well understood.

Objective: The objective was to examine longitudinal associations of breakfast skipping in childhood and adulthood with cardiometabolic risk factors in adulthood.

Design:
In 1985, a national sample of 9–15-y-old Australian children reported whether they usually ate breakfast before school. During follow-up in 2004–2006, 2184 participants (26–36 y of age) completed a meal-frequency chart for the previous day. Skipping breakfast was defined as not eating between 0600 and 0900. Participants were classified into 4 groups: skipped breakfast in neither childhood nor adulthood (n = 1359), skipped breakfast only in childhood (n = 224), skipped breakfast only in adulthood (n = 515), and skipped breakfast in both childhood and adulthood (n = 86). Diet quality was assessed, waist circumference was measured, and blood samples were taken after a 12-h fast (n = 1730). Differences in mean waist circumference and blood glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations were calculated by linear regression.

Results: After adjustment for age, sex, and sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, participants who skipped breakfast in both childhood and adulthood had a larger waist circumference (mean difference: 4.63 cm; 95% CI: 1.72, 7.53 cm) and higher fasting insulin (mean difference: 2.02 mU/L; 95% CI: 0.75, 3.29 mU/L), total cholesterol (mean difference: 0.40 mmol/L; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.68 mmol/L), and LDL cholesterol (mean difference: 0.40 mmol/L; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.64 mmol/L) concentrations than did those who ate breakfast at both time points. Additional adjustments for diet quality and waist circumference attenuated the associations with cardiometabolic variables, but the differences remained significant.

Conclusions: Skipping breakfast over a long period may have detrimental effects on cardiometabolic health. Promoting the benefits of eating breakfast could be a simple and important public health message.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, American Society for Nutrition
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031455

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