Alternative water strategies in public domains : innovative strategies in progress along North Terrace, Adelaide

Jones, David 2004, Alternative water strategies in public domains : innovative strategies in progress along North Terrace, Adelaide, in WSUD 2004 : IHP papers presented at the International conference on water sensitive urban design "Cities as catchments", Adelaide, Australia 22-23 November 2004 : proceedings, Unesco Jakarta Office, Jakarta, Indonesia, pp. 694-700.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Alternative water strategies in public domains : innovative strategies in progress along North Terrace, Adelaide
Author(s) Jones, David
Conference name International Conference on Water Sensitive Urban Design (2004 : Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 21-25 Nov. 2004
Title of proceedings WSUD 2004 : IHP papers presented at the International conference on water sensitive urban design "Cities as catchments", Adelaide, Australia 22-23 November 2004 : proceedings
Editor(s) James, R.
Daniell, T.
Takara, K.
Publication date 2004
Start page 694
End page 700
Total pages [700 p.]
Publisher Unesco Jakarta Office
Place of publication Jakarta, Indonesia
Summary Water sensitive design on our urban threshold is increasingly becoming topical. In Adelaide it is being driven by stormwater management strategies and economic efficiencies in a city that is beginning to embrace its Mediterranean environment, low water sustainability, and whether our showpiece public domains in Adelaide can afford large expanses of manicured lawns.

This paper reviews four projects in progress along the North Terrace in Adelaide. The first involves a major redesign of First Creek as it traverses Adelaide Botanic Garden to address stormwater management issues. The redesign includes strategies to control flash flooding, to cleanse stream water from pollutants, and to carefully incorporate a wetland system as an integral botanical and horticultural feature of a botanic garden. Further down North Terrace, the University of Adelaide is evaluating a scenario that will totally redesign Goodman Crescent, its picture-postcard promenade lawn. The scenario is to host an integrated water retention and water purification and cleansing system that will service independently of mains water an irrigation system and a waterfall. The proposal draws upon a similar strategy recently adopted by the South Australian Museum to capture and cleanse surface and roof water but place the installation and process on display as part of its overall biodiversity museum display that will unfold over the next five years under director Tim Flannery. The fourth example, in process at present, is to devise an integrated water system that may enable the Government House grounds to remove itself from dependence upon costly mains water to totally sustain its extensive gardens and lawns.

Importantly each project has similar threads: creative water maximization and purification use, and a desire to place these ‘installations’ on display as public statements of their commitment to water sustainability in Adelaide. But radically, here are four prominent cultural institutions readily willing to redefine the notion and traditional visual imagery of a ‘wetland’ on what is the main cultural boulevard of a capital city.
ISBN 1876346523
9781876346522
Language eng
Field of Research 120199 Architecture not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 870299 Construction Design not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Unesco Jakarta Office
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30031782

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 135 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Dec 2010, 09:30:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.